Search

nashville public art

No art left behind

Category

Restaurant and bars

Tin Dog

Nashville street art mural "Welcome to Old Nashville"

Welcome to Old Nashville. That’s an interesting greeting for Tin Dog Tavern to make. On the one hand, it’s relatively new, having opened in 2014. But it’s also true that there’s been a dive bar on this corner of 4th Avenue South for a while. Before it was Tin Dog, it was Purple Heys, and before that, it was TC’s Triangle (the building is triangle shaped). Tin Dog sits in an interesting place. It lies on the border between Wedgewood-Houston and Chestnut Hill, two rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods that still have significant chunks of their older versions. Warehouses, factories, auto repair places and low-income housing sit side-by-side with art galleries and some of the newest high-end housing in town. Just south, the Fairgrounds are poised to become home to Nashville’s major league soccer stadium. Compared to all that, Tin Dog is very much Old Nashville. It’s anyone’s guess how long it, or some succeeding dive bar, will stick it out. The sign is an Eastside Murals creation. On the other side of the building is a graffiti installation that bears tags from the UH crew. (See below).

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Graffiti street art tags Nashville

Graffiti street art Nashville

Graffiti street art Nashville Tin Dog

Located at 1401 4th Avenue South, at the corner with Rains Avenue. The Welcome to Nashville mural faces Rains Ave. The graffiti mural is on the south side of the building, facing an alleyway. Tin Dog has parking, much of it right in front of the mural. If you want to find the mural car-free, try early in the morning.

Flower balm

Lip and flowers mural street art Nashville

Back when the spot now occupies by Walden was home to The Hop Stop, there was a first a mural for The Hop Stop on the building housing the bar, and then later another Hop Stop mural appeared across from it on the building where the East Tattoo Collective is found. Now Walden has followed suit, with another Tara Marie Aversa mural to go with the one on the Walden building. (There’s also one inside.) The hashtag is #flowerbalm, hence the blog title, but I did try to come up with something clever about the Rolling Stones. Did you know they had an album called Flowers? News to me – learn something new every day!

Located at 2913 Gallatin Pike, on the south side of the building. There is plenty of parking, but it’s a pay lot. There is no nearby free street parking.

Come together

TOMSWooden

Sometimes I blog about art that’s a few years old and doesn’t exist anymore. And sometimes I blog about art less than a week old. There has been a mural explosion on Gallatin Pike, and I could easily spend the next week or two just blogging about all the new murals on that road. One of the newest is this one, “Come Together” by Brian Wooden, he of the headless suits/suits with rose heads. It’s part of a national campaign against gun violence called “End Gun Violence Together” sponsored by Blake Mycoskie and the company he founded, the shoe and apparel company TOMS. This is one of two murals related to the campaign by Wooden in town – the other is in The Gulch and will probably be on this blog someday. It might have been finished earlier if not for the incessant rains of late. It’s part of a national mural campaign promoted by TOMS and Mycoskie. Here’s an example of another take on the design by Ruben Rojas. You can find many more examples on the Instagram page of Tyler Ramsey, an artist who is helping TOMS promote the mural campaign. (Neither his page nor anything at TOMS or on Mycoskie’s page makes clear who made the original design.) I should note this is the second time I have featured gun politics related art. The Dog is a work by Ryan Barbour that supports gun rights (and apparently there are newer sculptures at that site I hope to feature later.)

Located at 2905 Gallatin Pike. It lies on the south side of the building that contains  Nicoletto’s Italian Kitchen and The Bowery Vault. The lots around this building and nearby businesses are mostly pay lots (except in the front), but there is some free parking in the alley behind.

The lost art of Bongo East, Part 1

LeahDancers.jpg

One of the first murals in town that really grabbed my attention was this one and the one of a boxer next to it. It sat on the north wall of Bongo East, the Five Points branch of the Bongo Java empire. I tried to post about it before, but I realized the only photos I had of it were slightly out of focus (it’s most notable if you look at the signature and tags on the right). And I never got a new picture before construction started in the lot in front of it. I had hoped to photograph it again, as it seemed to be destined to face an open courtyard, but I saw recently that it had been painted over, a white blank wall taking its place. I suppose it clashed with the esthetic of the new building. Interestingly, it’s by Leah Tumerman, the same artist who did the bear mural on the side of Eastside Cycles, which replaced the mural in the banner of this blog, and was somewhat controversial, which I wrote about in one of my very first posts on this blog. This piece is called “Deeply Dimensional Women,” and you can find more pictures of it and close-ups on Timerman’s website. (Interestingly, her large photo of it also seems out of focus on the signature and tags.) The tags include one for Color Theory Studios, so Tinsley Dempsy likely was involved in getting this mural produced. The boxer mural you see in the photo below by Eastside Murals seems to have also been destroyed. It’s certainly blocked from view by the new building. I’ll devote another post to it later.

Construction

Located at 107 Sout 11th Street, or at least it was. The tomato-fist mural still exists, and you can see it from the sidewalk. I’ll post about it later as well. This is Five Points. There is free parking on some of the side streets, but you may have to walk a bit.

Donut art in East Nashville

Oakley

I would like to lose weight – this ain’t going to help. Donut Distillery is setting up shop in East Nashville, just a few blocks from my house. Originating as a food truck, Donut Distillery is going brick-and-mortar and bringing new life to the old Mrs. Winners on Gallatin near Five Points. Though not open just yet, it’s already sporting a spiffy new mural by Kristy Oakley, who does business under the name Where the Art Is. Oakley has been on this blog before, for her work in Donelson. This mural most resembles the main mural she did that is featured in Welcome to Donelson, with the large block letters filled with images of local symbols. There are references here to the streets that form Five Points (“E”), East Nashville Magnet (“A” – alma mater long ago of Oprah Winfrey and also just across the street), Mas Tacos Por Favor and Pharmacy Burger Parlor (“T” – Mas Tacos is another food truck now settled down in four walls), The Treehouse (“A”),  the Tomato Art Festival (“S”), Five Points Pizza (“V” – clever – the Roman numeral 5 – “V”  and a pizza slice), I Dream of Weenie (“L”)  and The Idea Hatchery (“E”). The guitar and records (“S”) might be a reference to Woodland Studios or all the music business in the area. The blue awnings in “H” have me stumped. The “L” with our zip code probably references Shelby Bottoms Park and the greenway, and the bottle of beer (“I”) all our many bars. The “N” of course is a nod to the patrons and their business. We also see the downtown skyline as seen from the east side, and the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge, which connects East Nashville to downtown.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

OakleySig

Located at 311 Gallatin Avenue. There is plenty of parking, and street parking is available on Ordway Place.

 

Bicycle Cat Wars

Once upon a time, Red Bicycle Coffee could be found on Gallatin Road, just up the street from La Hacienda. They have since decamped up the road, and are now found across from Casa Azafrán (and a couple other places). They left behind some murals in the backyard, which the new business in the space seems to have embraced. Which makes some sense, given that one of the images is a giant cat, and the new folks in the space are Mewsic Kitty Cafe, which allows patrons to interact with foster kitties waiting for adoption. I have only been able to ascertain that these murals were done by a former Red Bicycle employee so if anyone knows the artist, please comment. The stencil of a cat going through a pet door is fairly recent, presumably by another artist, and the sign out front was designed by Alpha-Tone Design.

BikeCatWide

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 2519 Nolensville Pike. The murals face the alley in back, which can be accessed from Grandview Avenue. There is a fair amount of parking.

Pastaria

PastariaMain

Pastaria in One City is a branch of a St. Louis restaurant of the same name. Which is why the art outside the building was designed by Atomic Dust, a St. Louis branding agency. The script and figures of children are clearly much the same as from the original 2012 project in St. Lous. When the Nashville branch opened, Atomic Dust relied on 12 Point Sign Works and Brand Imaging Group for much of the local production work. There’s photo in this Atomic Dust blog post about the Nashville Pastaria projet that shows three men installing the mural above, one of whom has a “Brand Imaging Group” t-shirt, so they presumably did the installation. Since doing this work in 2017, Brand Imaging Group has become independent and is now know as Big Visual Group. It’s not clear if the “8” made up of words from a quote by Jane Jacobs is part of the Pastaria branding or not. The quote, which discusses urban design, would seem to fit the mission of One City, but as it also discusses children’s play, either is possible.

Pastaria8

Located at 8 City Boulevard, in the One City center, which is on the east side of the 28th/31st Street Connector, just south of Charlotte Avenue. There is free street parking and free garage parking. Grab some grub and enjoy the art!

Lockeland Boutique

LockelandTable.jpg

The small brick building at the corner of Woodland and 16th Street has a long history. Starting out as an H.G. Hills in the 1930s, it became the beauty shop and salon Boutique Coiffures sometime around 1970. That’s what it was when I moved to the Lockeland Springs neighborhood about fifteen years ago. Of course today the building houses one of the best restaurants in Nashville, Lockeland Table, which opened in 2012. Thankfully, the owners of Lockeland Table kept the wonderful mural of the previous tenants, no doubt confusing the occasional tourist. It is also a reminder of just how much this neighborhood has changed, not just once, but many times. It is reminiscent of some of the older murals found in the Buchanan Street neighborhood. You can read a little more about the building in Lockeland Table’s press kit.

Located at 1520 Woodland Street. The mural is on the east side of the building, facing 16th Street. Street parking is available, particularly on 16th Street. Get you some grub and enjoy the art!

Flowers of Walden

WaldenFull.jpg

Murals come and murals go. This was once the site of a hoppy mural featured in Have a beer! A really big beer!. But the sponsoring bar, The Hop Stop, closed. Soon, a new bar called Walden came to occupy the space. A new bar, of course, meant the need for a new mural. This explosion of flowers is the work of Tara Marie Aversa, and from the looks of that page, flowers are a common theme in her paintings. There’s a photo of her at work on this mural, and she also did a flower themed mural inside the bar.

Located at 2909-B Gallatin Pike. There is plenty of parking, but it’s a pay lot. There is no nearby free street parking.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑