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Hidden art

El Nuevo Amanecer

Bar mural street art Nashville

The new dawn – that’s what El Nuevo Amanecer means. An interesting name for a bar, particularly since it’s not clear it’s even a going concern. Their Facebook page shows that they had a couple of shows last year, but nothing since September. The only review is from someone complaining about the noise. And this site that keeps track of business licenses lists Nuevo Amanecer as “Inactive Dissolved.” The artist is also mysterious. While I would guess whoever did this is likely one of the artists who specialize in decorating Latino businesses, those artists not only usually sign their work but add their phone number as well, in case you want to hire them. There’s nothing on this one. Given this is just a few blocks from the future soccer stadium, I imagine some developer will snatch it up soon enough. Get your selfies soon.

Located at 398 Rosedale Avenue. This is at the corner of Nolensville Road, along the 2200 block behind Restaurante El Paraiso. There is plenty of parking.

Paradise (Norf Wall gallery, part 13)

Hale

Some of the very first posts on this blog were about the Norf Wall project at the old tire factory at the corner of 19th and Heman (you can read a description of it in the first post about the project, Part 1). The last few pieces I had not yet gotten around to posting about are mostly unsigned ones, but it turns out this piece does have a signature, from Adam Hale, a local artist. You can read something about his approach and hear it from himself in this profile on Raw. Sadly, a lot of the art in this series is hard to see now. The art in the interior courtyard, like this one, is mostly blocked from view as the courtyard has come to be used as a major storage area.

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8 Part 9 Part 10 Part 11 Part 12

See the pin for Part 1 on the map. Located at the north end of the 800 block of 19th Street N., at the corner of Herman Street. It’s impossible to miss. Street parking is very haphazard. There is a lot of art to see here, and also a lot of overgrown weeds (depending on the time of year) so wear the right shoes!

Camino y Raíces/Roots & Routes

Roots

There’s mixed media, and then there’s mixed media. The sculpture of a stack of books at the Downtown Library featured in Heavy reading is made from stones from five continents. “Camino y Raíces/Roots & Routes” in Azafrán Park contains coins from no less than 77 countries. Azafrán Park, which opened in August, is the result of a partnership between Conexión Américas and Metro Parks and Recreation, among others. It sits on the north side of Casa Azafrán, where the Park building featured in Color me gone – soon once stood. It serves to provide a community space, particularly for children, in a section of town that has little open green space. This piece was produced by Jairo Prado in collaboration with students from the Opportunity Now program. As explained in this Nashville Arts interview with Prado, the students came from Glencliff, Nashville School for the Arts, Overton, and Hume Fogg. The mural, by its title and its coins from many lands, speaks to the different origins of many Nashvillians, particularly the immigrant community along Nolensville and Murfreesboro Pikes. Prado of course also designed and led the production of the mosaic that adorns the front of Casa Azafrán, Migration. The coins for this mural were collected at Casa Azafrán, in the community and even at the airport! This is a bit of an art hotspot. The mosaic faces the giant photo mural from Oz Arts Inside/Out, Part 1. The mural featured in Hidden away is really hidden now, as there is a concrete wall in front of it, but it can still be glimpsed from the side and through some holes in the wall. And there’s a mural on that concrete wall I’ll feature later, as well as some mobile giant snails from Cracking Art and a colorful block arrangement for kids to play on. All of it will probably be on the blog eventually.

Located at 2187 Nolensville Pike. There is parking in front and behind Casa Azafrán.

Bicycle Cat Wars

Once upon a time, Red Bicycle Coffee could be found on Gallatin Road, just up the street from La Hacienda. They have since decamped up the road, and are now found across from Casa Azafrán (and a couple other places). They left behind some murals in the backyard, which the new business in the space seems to have embraced. Which makes some sense, given that one of the images is a giant cat, and the new folks in the space are Mewsic Kitty Cafe, which allows patrons to interact with foster kitties waiting for adoption. I have only been able to ascertain that these murals were done by a former Red Bicycle employee so if anyone knows the artist, please comment. The stencil of a cat going through a pet door is fairly recent, presumably by another artist, and the sign out front was designed by Alpha-Tone Design.

BikeCatWide

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Located at 2519 Nolensville Pike. The murals face the alley in back, which can be accessed from Grandview Avenue. There is a fair amount of parking.

I see purple

BDonahueForrestPurple

Back when I blogged about the Mermaid House, the former owner contacted me. She let me know that there were more murals around back. Like the mermaid in front, this mural is the work of Brandon Donahue, who, like myself, is a professor at Tennesee State University. There is also something of a surprise here. For the most part, graffiti taggers are respectful of murals, but not this time. The style of the tag is one I’ve seen around East Nashville. “Editing” is always a possibility with outdoor art. The back fence of the yard of the house next door also has a colorful mural. (See the slideshow below.) It’s not signed and does not appear on Donahue’s website, so I’m not sure who made it. One notable detail on this second mural is the small “Hunter’s” sign. Hunter’s was an auto body shop that had extravagant signage a couple blocks from these houses, signage lost in the site’s recent renovation (though not completely – it does appear some of it is being saved).

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Located in the alley behind at 1205 and 1203 Forrest Ave. Street parking is available. These are private homes, so be respectful.

Beautiful Decay

BeautifulDecay

This mural manages to be both very large and yet somewhat hidden as well, located as it in an alleyway behind the Downtown Presbyterian Church. Part of the Nashville Walls Project, this mural, called “Beautiful Decay,” is by the Berlin-based American artist Tavar Zawacki. Zawacki started his career as an anonymous graffiti artist using the handle “ABOVE.” In time, he made use of an “above arrow” as his signature. Now that he has come out of the shadows, arrows are still a motif in his work. You can read his description of this mural on his website, and the Nashville Walls Project has a nice photo spread showing the creation of the mural. The trompe l’oeil lends itself to some obvious picture ideas.

Located at 144 5th Avenue North. That’s the address of the parking garage it’s painted on. The church it’s behind is at 154 5th Avenue North, at the corner with Church Street. This is downtown – plenty of parking, almost none of it free.

Angels and monsters

PresbyFull

The mural that graces the parking lot of the Downtown Presbyterian Church is difficult to photograph, as it faces a narrow lot and there are usually cars parked in front of it. Turns out, Sunday evening on Labor Day weekend is the time to get a clean shot. The work, done in 2007, is by four artists. The giant angel and the billy goat are by John Grider, the long-legged beasts are by Isaac Arvold, the colorful mountain by Drew Peterson, and the geometric “clouds” are by Eric Inkala. The mural indicates that it was made possible by the church and by Twist Art Gallery, which closed a few years ago. Grider has done both the goat and the angel in other places. There are other murals close by, including one that faces this same parking lot I haven’t featured yet.

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Located at 154 5th Ave North. That’s the address of the church. The mural is actually on the side of 415 Church Street. The parking lot is best accessed from the alley that parallels Church Street behind the Presbyterian Church. This is downtown, so lots of parking, virtually none of it free.

Hidden lands

A&ITower

Above is a detail of the mural that is found on the east wall of Art and Invention Gallery.  It is impossible to take a full picture of this mural, for parts of it are hidden behind BBMS and Riveter, two of the shops found at The Idea Hatchery. The Idea Hatchery is a small business incubator on Woodland, with eight small sheds that contain local start-up businesses. Riveter is a jewelry shop, while BBMS sells the clothing of fashion designer Maria “Poni” Silver.  The sheds obscure the mural, but if you peer around the back of them, you can still see the whole mural. It was done by Phil Carrol and Todd Hatfield and is dated 2001, making it one of the older murals in Nashville. According to the owner of The Idea Hatchery, Carrol and Hatfield work in the film industry and did the mural once when they were briefly in Nashville.  (There are IMDB pages for both those names for people who do art for movies, but I’m not completely confident they are the right people.) In the slideshow below, I show the various sections of the mural going left to right.

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Located at 1106 Woodland Street. There is street parking and paid parking in the area. I recommend the 100 block of 12th Street North (just north of Woodland) as the closest place to easily find free parking. Fill up on goods from small local businesses and enjoy the art!

Public art, sort of

HobsonHouse

When is art “public”? If you can see it from a spot where it’s legal for the public to be, I’d say that’s public. But some cases stretch that definition. This mural is found on Hobson House, East Nashville’s oldest home (parts of it date to 1806), which is occasionally the scene of small concerts and record releases. The Andee Rudloff mural from 2016 is, in fact, visible from the alley behind Hobson House. There’s a private property sign right about where I took this picture from some months ago. I can’t recommend you stand in front of the mural and get your picture taken without permission of the property owners. Maybe just enjoy it here on my blog, or wait for a show and get the picture then.

Located at 814 Woodland street. As mentioned, it is visible from the alley behind Woodland, which can be accessed from 8th or 9th Avenue South. This is private property, marked as such, so be respectful.

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