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nashville public art

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Signs

Hidden cow

PueblitoPatrillos.jpg

Once there was a cow on the side of a supermarket. But an addition was built, which hid the cow, at least in part. But then a new cow appeared, and there was rejoicing in the land. Ok, maybe not. But it’s obvious from the picture above that there is a partially hidden mural at El Pueblito Super Mercado, which for better or worse was left in place when a storage shed was built in front of it. The shed advertises Los Potrillos Caniceria, which presumably provides meat for El Pueblito. To the best of my knowledge, “potrillo” means “colt,” but I doubt they are serving horsemeat. The Potrillos mural is signed by José F. Vargas, he of many other Latino grocery murals.  The half-hidden mural seems to be his style as well. There is a display of meats and fruits on the front that is probably also by Vargas, but it isn’t signed.

Located at 948 Richards Rd, at the corner with Antioch Pike. The market has lots of parking. Fill up your grocery bags and enjoy the art!

Eastland graffiti

EastlandDuff

It is becoming more and more evident that Nashville business owners understand the importance of art as part of their self-presentation. The Eastland is yet another of the many upscale apartment and condo buildings that have been sprouting like weeds in the current Nashville real estate market. It’s all crisp modern lines, muted whites and greys, but then you turn into the little tunnel that links the parking lot to the road and you encounter this vivid splash of color, courtesy of Troy Duff. There are the obvious neighborhood nods, like “615” and “37206.” It’s also a sign. Look closely under the arrow, and you’ll see “The Eastland.” It isn’t signed, but following a hunch that it was his work, I found it on Duff’s Instagram page. That post is dated August 27, 2017, making the piece about a year old.

Located at 1035 West Eastland. There is parking at the apartment building and some limited street parking, as well as an adjacent parking garage.

Hide Out

HiCHMain

This is one of the first murals I photographed when I was beginning to think about this blog (though I’ve misplaced those pictures, this one is new). There is so much art out there, sometimes I don’t get to stuff for a while. This piece is by the artist behind Deathspan Studios and is on the back side of High Class Hillbilly. HCH is a vintage clothing store owned by singer-songwriter Nikki Lane, and it was on her Instagram account I was able to track down who the artist was. It dates from September 2015 and is sort of hidden, but you can see it from Gallatin Pike if you take your eyes off the road. There’s also a couple of interesting signs on a nearby wall, one for HCH and the other for Beautiful Tan & Hair Design. If you look real close at the Beautiful sign you’ll see a faint hand applying nail polish to the “a.”

HCHSigns

Located at 4604 Gallatin Pike. The main mural is on the back side of the building facing south, while the signs are on the south wall that is closest to Gallatin Pike. There is plenty of parking in front and behind the building. Get your nails done, grab a vintage jacket, and enjoy the art!

 

Abracadabra

HPMain

This is a tale of two murals and two stores. The Hokus Pokus mural by Music City Murals on Gallatin advertises the vape store of the same name. The MCM guys must be really proud of it, as they use it as the cover art on their Facebook page. Hokus Pokus has also used the design in a billboard farther south on Gallatin. Before this mural, however, there used to be a graffiti art mural here with the “Betor” tag, he of Betor Forever. I thought I had my own photograph of it, but I can’t find it, so I’ve posted a Google street view shot below. But wait, there’s more! Sage and Serpent is a tattoo parlor in the same building, and below I include their interesting sign and an image that is posted on the back of the building. I don’t know who did either, but I would hazard a guess it’s one or both of the two artists who own Sage and Serpent.

HPold

Located at 4118 Gallatin Pike. The main mural is on the north side of the building, while the Sage and Serpent sign is on the front and the image of a hand is on the back side. There is plenty of parking in front and back of the building.

 

Dogs, beer, signs

ENBDogMural

There are a lot of dog lovers in East Nashville. You see people out walking their dogs all the time, everywhere. So it only makes sense for East Nashville Beer Works to create a dog-friendly area to get some of that dog-lover money. You can’t have them coming in the front door though since ENBW sells food. Hence a special entrance with a special sign, this one by David W. of Manecoon Design Company. ENBW made that a little bit hard to track down – they don’t credit artists on their website, Facebook page, or Twitter account, but you can find artists’ names on their Instagram account. And I say “artists” because they also have a couple of nice signs that were done by Bryce Damuth, who bills himself as both an artist and a comedian. See his work below.

Located at 320 East Trinity Lane. The white sign is on the east side of the building, everything else is on the west side. ENBW has a fair amount of parking. Bring Rover, grab some beer, and enjoy the art!

Down on the farm

EvergreenFarmFull

When people think Nashville, they think the glitz of Lower Broad, the hipness of 12 South or maybe the interstate traffic jams of all over. But Nashville is merged with Davidson Country, and there are plenty of rural areas, with actual farms, just a few miles from downtown, particularly in the north-central and northwestern parts of the country. Part of this is geography, where a winding river cuts off places far from a bridge, and a steep climb as you go north and west also restricts development. Farm country doesn’t produce a whole lot of outdoor art, but it’s not completely barren. I think this sign on the barn at Evergreen Farm on Brick Church Pike definitely qualifies. I thought about just isolating the sign in the main picture, but the real effect is with the full tableau. I couldn’t find a website for the farm as a farm, but apparently, there is a cabin you can rent.

EvergreenFarmSIgn

Located at 4412 Brick Church Pike. There is no street parking on Brick Church, but less than 100 feet away is the intersection with Jackson Road, and it is possible to park there. This is a private home, so be respectful. And wave at the horses!

Camels and jellyfish, naturally

CamelMain1

I don’t usually take photos from this far away, but I would have a very stretched out photo if I’d gotten closer. This Murals and More work by Michael Cooper is kind of gargantuan. And of course with murals, there’s not a lot you can do to adjust the canvas. The canvas here is the south-facing wall of Camel Express Car Wash. This is, of course, the long tunnel that the cars pass through, and if the client wants the whole wall done, this is the shape of the mural you will get. And it’s no doubt a good investment. Anyone headed north on Dickerson Pike is going to get a clear view from a good ways off, just after they pass under I-65 and Briley Parkway. Cooper deploys his usual trompe l’oeil technique in a particularly colorful way here. I’m not sure I’d want my car to actually go through the process displayed, however! Camel Express features some “making of” photos (dated in mid-March, 2018) on their Facebook photo page (there are more than the ones I linked). One thing you can see is that while Cooper’s name is on the mural, he had other people working with him.

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Located at 3430 Doverside Drive. This is off the southern entrance road that leads to the Lowes and Wallmart that are just north of Briley Parkway on Dickerson Pike. Your best bet for parking is probably the Murphy Express next door. There is a sidewalk on Doverside, so you could walk from the Wallmart parking lot, or just scramble down the hill. Get your car spiffed up and enjoy the art!

 

Nectar of the gods

TonysFoodland

That’s what one of my professors in graduate school called Dr. Pepper. He is Texan, like me. Sure, we moved to Georgia when I was six, but I never lost the taste for Dr. Pepper. I drink the diet stuff now, and yes, I lost a lot of weight. Because I was drinking a LOT of Dr. Pepper. Wait, this is an art blog! This Dr. Pepper branded tank (presumably not a tank of Dr. Pepper) is at  Tony’s Foodland, a grocery store in Joelton, on Clarksville Pike. Joelton is a very different part of Davidson County from what most people think of as Nashville. It’s much more rural, with actual farms, and houses with huge rural lots. But it’s as much a part of Metro Nashville-Davidson as Lower Broad, which is something that makes Nashville truly great. The Facebook page for Tony’s Foodland has only one picture of the tank with its current livery, which is dated July 13 of last year. I don’t think it’s much older than that, as I drove up there around that time and don’t remember seeing it.

Located at 5529 Clarksville Pike. This is just north of Old Hickory Boulevard. The tank is on the northwest side of the store. There is plenty of parking because it’s a grocery store. Grab a couple liters of Dr. Pepper and enjoy the art!

Red, white and blue barber

ReedWest

When your business sits on a street named after your competitor, who is less than a block away, and when that competitor gets business in part because of his very famous daughter, it helps to have a bright colorful sign to help you stand out. Not that Reed and Sons Barbershop needs to worry too much about the competition from Vernon Winfrey’s Barber Shop. Both have been around for quite awhile and have loyal clienteles that have in some cases been coming for decades. Founded by Carl Reed fifty-eight years ago, it is now run by his grandson Tony D. Reed. Both Carl and Tony A. Reed (Tony D.’s father) can still be found cutting hair from time to time. A 2015 photo found in the Tennesee Ledger story linked above shows the facade as being orange, so this more colorful version is recent. In a rapidly gentrifying Nashville, it’s good to see such an important local institution continuing to thrive.

Located at 410 Vernon Winfrey Avenue. The facade above faces Lischey Avenue. Free street parking is readily available. Get a trim and enjoy the art!

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