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Angels and monsters

PresbyFull

The mural that graces the parking lot of the Downtown Presbyterian Church is difficult to photograph, as it faces a narrow lot and there are usually cars parked in front of it. Turns out, Sunday evening on Labor Day weekend is the time to get a clean shot. The work, done in 2007, is by four artists. The giant angel and the billy goat are by John Grider, the long-legged beasts are by Isaac Arvold, the colorful mountain by Drew Peterson, and the geometric “clouds” are by Eric Inkala. The mural indicates that it was made possible by the church and by Twist Art Gallery, which closed a few years ago. Grider has done both the goat and the angel in other places. There are other murals close by, including one that faces this same parking lot I haven’t featured yet.

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Located at 154 5th Ave North. That’s the address of the church. The mural is actually on the side of 415 Church Street. The parking lot is best accessed from the alley that parallels Church Street behind the Presbyterian Church. This is downtown, so lots of parking, virtually none of it free.

Impermanent, The Nations

MPSouthFull

And the blog is back! How about a whole lot of art to celebrate? Back in April, there was an art show at an old warehouse in The Nations whose only indication of its past is a damaged sign that seems to have once read “Motor Parts.” The show was carried out by Impermanent, which bills itself as “a collective of artists who are displaying their talents in the world of subversive and immersive art within an uninhibiting environment,” and was done in partnership with Nashville Civic Design Center and The Oasis Real Foundation. The show produced art both inside and out at the warehouse. This blog covers outdoor art, but you can see some of the creations inside in this video. Some of the work on the outside features tags associated with the UH crew. There is one piece signed by Brandon Donahue (look for the “ink blot” image that is the second image in the South Wall slideshow below). On the Impermanent website the orange face above is credited to Sterbo, and based on style, the mouse on the south wall and the mouse and head on the north wall appear to be the work of Adam Hale, while the ice cream colored scene around the orange face fits the style of Kevin Bongang. Presumably, the other artists listed on Impermanent’s Who page were also involved in producing the outdoor art. (I really should have gone to this show – I’d be better informed. It must have been laundry night!) Go check it out soon. An abandoned warehouse in the go-go-go real estate market of The Nations won’t last long.

East Wall, left to right.

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South Wall, left to right.

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West Wall, full, then left to right.

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North Wall, left to right

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Located at 1211 57th Avenue North. Street parking is available.

The blog pauses

MapofCarib

Your intrepid blogger is taking a bit of a trip, to Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and Suriname. So the blog goes on hiatus for a week or so. I’ll be looking for outdoor art while I’m there, of course. You’ll find some of it on my Instagram and Facebook pages. Back soon!

300 – Map Edition

ArtMap

As of the last posting, That boat has sailed, there are now three hundred marked points where you can (or could) look for art on this blog’s map. Some points actually reference several pieces of art and multiple posts, notably for the Norf Wall and Off the Wall projects. Some of the art, including the one from the last post, no longer exists. I am working on updating the relevant pages. This isn’t just a guide though, it’s also an archive (I am an historian, after all), so I think it’s important to maintain a record of what has come and gone.

I went through all the markers to catch any editing problems. Along the way, I noticed something. Each marker has an image of the art that can be found at that spot. I have become a lot more particular about the photos I use on this blog. Whereas I once tolerated heavy shadows and bad light, I do so no more. I have several images for future posts filed under the heading “needs to be reshot!”

The blog is motoring along as we approach the second anniversary in June. In 2017, 400-700 page views a month was normal. Since January,  1400 has been the norm, peaking with 1675 in March. In all of 2017, there were 7583 page views. As of this posting, there have 6243 for all of 2018 so far, more than double last year’s pace. Still small potatoes, but a healthy growth trajectory. It helps that some posts remain perennially popular. The Kind Way is the reigning champ.

Located on a tab on the menu bar. Look for a new menu tab soonish for artists (though not right away – it’s a slow process and I’m about halfway through).

That’s the point

ThePoint

The expanding outdoor art scene in Nashville is more than just murals and the occasional sculpture. Increasing numbers of businesses are discovering the importance of upping their sign game. Particularly when you’re located in a fairly drab industrial area where all the buildings look the same, a bold sign can really make you stand out. Meghan Wood of I Saw the Sign has been building a business based on that idea. That giant “EAST” that you must have seen by now is her work, as is the art featured in Swayze lives! Her handiwork is seen here on the 720 at the Point building. “Fessey” is the name of the road out front and the business park 720 is in. The building is owned by Anchor Investments, which explains the second I Saw the Sign piece below. There is an event and workspace inside (see the 720 link) and at least two businesses call the building home: Aloompa, which makes custom apps for mobile devices, and Bed Roc, which provides technology consulting services, even for evil galactic empires. Whether the Bed Roc signs (see below) are Wood’s work is unclear – they don’t appear on her client showcase.

Anchor

Located at 720 Fessey Park Roak. Fessey Park is southeast of the Fairgrounds, near the interstate. The main sign faces east, the “legacy” sign faces the road (south), while the Bed Roc metal sign is on the southwest corner and their painted sign is on the north side of the building, away from the road. This is an industrial area with easy parking. Amp up your tech game and enjoy the art!

An update and a goodbye

HopStopMissed

I’ve been meaning to update Have a beer! A really big beer! for some time, as a new mural was added (above) facing the original, and either I missed the one on the back wall the first time, or it got added later. In any event, the one above is quite appropriate, because unless you get there before close on Wednesday (November 15, 2017), you will have, in fact, missed The Hop Stop, which is set to close for good that night. The new proprietors plan a craft brewery designed to cater to Hop Stop customers. Perhaps then they will only make changes to the name in the three murals, but that remains to be seen. While not signed, these two are presumably the work of Anthony Billups, who did the one featured in “Have a beer!” See the pin for that post on the map.

UPDATE: This has been painted over.

HopStopBack

Located at 2909B and 2913 Gallatin Pike. The mural above is on the south wall of 2913, home of East Tattoo Collective. The one below is on the back, western side of 2909B where The Hop Stop will be located for one more day. Plenty of parking – and some good food and some good beer if you’re really quick!

Glyph man

This unusual face has a striking resemblance to the Mayan glyph for balam, the word for “jaguar” and “strength.” The glyph has fangs and is more cat-like, but the pattern of dots and lack of adornment, along with the general shape, suggests a humanized balam. Or maybe it’s just random graffiti.

Located at 1309 McGavock Pike, on the back side of Relax and Wrap Barber and Style (well, that’s what the sign says – on the internet, it’s known and Relaxing Wraps Barber and Style.) There’s plenty of parking here and across the street, though often full with partons of the Village Pub and Garden. Baily and Cato, sadly, has closed. Get a cut, grab some grub, and enjoy the art!

The blog takes a vacation

puerto-rico-flag

Your intrepid blogger is off to Puerto Rico until mid-August. I’ll be back with more Nashville art after my fun in the Caribbean!

The Carquest Gallery, Part 2

Car Quest Back Middle

This blog has been a learning process. One thing I’ve learned – look on the back side of buildings. There’s a lot of art where few people can see it. Back in November 2016, I posted about the very obvious murals visible from Nolensville road on the front and side of CarQuest. I did not, however, take a few steps to look around back. I did note though at the time that there were murals on the back side visible on Google street view, and I vowed to update. Well, here I am, updating. Usually, when there are several murals in one place, my top photo is the wide view of all of them, with a slide show of the individual ones below. But I like this one so much I decided to feature it. These three murals were clearly painted over other, older murals, which only highlights the transience of outdoor art and the need to document it. Next to the blue door, we see “Kyle Korea.” While that may be the name or handle of an artist, Camp Kyle was a U.S. Army base in Korea closed in 2005, so that might also be the reference. See the map pin for Part 1.

Part 1

Located at 3317 Nolensville Road, at the corner with Elgin Street. There’s some street parking on Elgin, and if things aren’t too busy at the Lava Lounge Hookah Bar next door, you might be able to park in their lot for a spell. Pick up some bling for your car and enjoy the art!

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