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nashville public art

No art left behind

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Graffiti

The pig abides

MuddyRootsPig

For some time now, the Live True Vintage building on Gallatin has advertised Muddy Roots Records and its festivals. (The link in the picture is dead.) Furthermore, there was some interesting graffiti art on the wall facing Elvira and the back of the building.  But Live True decamped to Old Hickory early last year, and the new occupants have finally gotten around to repainting the building. All the art is gone, except for our banjo playing pig and the sign right above. And he’s now against a black background, a photo I’ll have to add later, as there’s been a truck in front of it recently. The purpose of this blog is not just to celebrate and inform, but also to archive, as outdoor art is particularly ephemeral. I’m not sure about the artists. The tags and hashtags don’t lead anyplace useful. If the new occupants add new art, I’ll be sure to blog about it.

MuddyRootsNorth

Located at 3121 Gallatin Pike, at the corner with Elvira Avenue. The surviving musical pig is on the south side of the building, easily visible from Gallatin. At present, it is possible to park in back, and in a pinch, you could park at Plasma Biological Services across the street.

Eastern Pizza

JetPizzaEdited

Ordinarily, I try to avoid shadows if I can, but this is another of those “there are always cars in front” pieces, specifically, the delivery vehicles of Jet’s Pizza are pretty much always parked in front of it, so I grabbed the shot I could. There’s a delivery car cropped out of frame just off the left side of the photo. This shout-out to East Nashville pride is a Troy Duff piece, an east side artist who frequently works in a graffiti style even when doing commissioned as opposed to “freelance” work.

Located at 721 Gallatin Avenue, on the south wall of Jet’s Pizza. The mural faces the parking lot of the neighboring Kroger, so there is lots and lots of parking.

Ice cream graffiti

LittonMain

Not too many homeowners willingly allow their property to be used as a canvas for graffiti artists, but not only has the owner at 1600 Litton allowed it, but done so on a major scale. This installation is large and bold, full of bright colors hard to ignore,  colors with more psychedelic pop than one usually sees in Nashville graffiti. Interestingly, Google street view has a March 2016 shot of this fence that shows different tags with a much bluer, laid back palette (see the slide show below). If you look close at the photo above you’ll see a section of fence laying against the garage that is apparently from that former installation. In both cases, the tags are familiar ones, generally associated with the UH crew, including the nearly ubiquitous “Rasmo” tag. The tag on the back fence also has a small “Betor,” which I think is a memorial, not a signature.

Located at 1600 Litton Street, at the corner of Litton and Branch, one block west of Riverside Drive. There is parking a little farther south on Branch, at the apartment complex. This is a private home, so be respectful.

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All Around and outta here

AllAroundFull

One thing this blog seeks to do is document art before it’s gone. There is a rezoning sign out in front of this property. This low wall and concrete floor is about all that’s left of All Around Pressure Washing on Dickerson Road. So while it sits and awaits replacement by some mixed use development, it’s become a canvas for taggers. The requested zoning is MUL-A, which, according to Metro, is for “Mixed Use Limited, intended for a moderate intensity mixture of residential, retail, and office uses.” The “A” is meant for walkable neighborhoods. On this stretch of Dickerson I’m not sure what this means, but maybe a stretch of sidewalk will go in. I can’t decipher the tags, but the one on the right is the same style as the one found in V! Something. There is an apparent signature – “Ask Noss V.” In any event, I imagine these tags are not long for the world. Call it endangered art.

Located at 3968 Dickerson Pike, on the west side of the road, a little north of Clean Quick Carpet Service (at 3492). When I was there is was possible to pull in and park on site.

A railroad runs through it

CemetaryMobe

A national cemetery is not a place you expect to find much graffiti. Taggers are generally more respectful, and the public and grounds crew quite intolerant. But if a railroad runs through the cemetery, and there’s a bridge the railroad goes under, and that bridge is actually just off of the graveyard grounds, that’s a different story. Where Walton Lane sails over the railroad that splits the Nashville National Cemetary, all these conditions are met. The walls that support the bridge are fairly well covered. Some of the tags are quite familiar. “Mobe,” featured above, is the handle of an artist I’ve featured before, who does both commissioned and “volunteer” murals. The earliest date seems to be 2008, and it looks like some of these tags lie on top of others, so graffiti artists have been using this site for a while. It’s also, as you can see from the photos, used as a camp by homeless Nashvillians.

CemetaryHasre

Located on the 100 block of Walton Lane under the railroad bridge, in the middle of the southern border of the National Cemetary, 1420 Gallatin Road South. Getting to this is tricky and bends the definition of public art. There is a spot about 50 feet north where the railroad track is level with the cemetery roads on either side. It is possible also to walk up to the west side and scramble up a “trail” to get to that area. The far eastern part, where the homeless camp is, requires either climbing up a four-foot wall, or walking down from Walton Lane. Trains do go through here, homeless sleep here, and the cemetery is right there, so be respectful and think carefully. Or maybe just look at my pictures.

CemetaryGreen

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For that perfect smile

Crest

I have to wonder how long this one is going to be around. Located near Plaza Art on Middleton, it lies right next to a major graffiti installation that was just painted over. This part of SoBro/Pie Town has been fairly resistant to gentrification, but that can’t last. The market forces are very powerful. I believe this says “Crest.” There’s one very much like it in Cheltenham, PA, on the north side of Philadelphia. (As of this posting, third row on that page. Look for “Crest Graffiti Cheltenham”.) I suspect it’s the product of an out of towner, because I don’t think I’ve seen this tag elsewhere, and the DayGlo color scheme is unusual here in Nashville. Even if it survives gentrification, for the time being, it’s peeling, likely because it faces the afternoon sun every day unshaded.

Located at 617 Middleton Street. Nearby parking is easy. The mural is on the west side of the building, facing Plaza Art.

New Life Records

NewLifeFull

Sometimes large things can hide in plain site. I have driven past this mural many times since it went up 2006 but only noticed it recently. And it’s very visible from a busy stretch of Charlotte, ensconced on the east wall of New Life Record Shop. The brain is a peculiar thing. New Life sells vinyl records, posters, shirts, and various music-related equipment and paraphernalia. It’s been in business since 1976, and the interior has a certain throwback vibe. The owner says that he allowed the mural to be put up, but was a little disappointed it mostly featured the tags of the artists. The duck in sunglasses is, however, the New Life mascot. There is a second mural/tag on a recessed wall next to the main mural (see below).

Located at 5343 Charlotte Avenue. There is parking at New Life and neighboring businesses. Grab some vinyl and enjoy the art!

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