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Grimm Rudloff

Grimm Rudloff Full Right

This colorful mural is a product of a Sister Cities of Nashville project, which brought artists from some of Nashville’s many sister cities to collaborate with each other and with Nashville artists back in late October and early November last year. One of those artists was Max Grimm from Magdeburg, Germany. (Here’s a profile in English.) He partnered with Andee Rudloff to create this colorful mural behind Smith & Lentz Brewing on Main Street. Rudloff, of course, has done many murals in Nashville, including one more-or-less across the street (and the first of her murals featured on this blog). The fence belongs to Urban Ecovillage – East Nashville, which describes itself as a “pop up community.” Rudloff and Grimm also partnered with another artist, Gabi Bianchi from Mendoza, Argentina to create another mural on Natchez Trace that I hope to feature on the blog soon.

Located at 900 Ramsey Street. The mural faces an alley that lies between Ramsey and Main Street, at the corner of North 9th Sreet. There is some street parking along 9th.

In my beautiful balloon

Street art mural of balloon with basket East Nashville

Some outdoor art is explicitly designed to be portrait and selfie-friendly, and that’s certainly the case with much of Kelsey Montague’s work. You can see that clearly on her Instagram page. Certainly that’s true with the wings down in The Gulch, also her work, and like this tagged #WhatLiftsYou. The wings are probably are most famous Nashville mural out of town – locals may be a little more familiar with the multiple I Believe in Nashville murals, particularly the one on 12 South. This Montague work, found on the east side of The Cleo apartments is not likely to attract as many lines as any of those murals, as it’s not in a highly touristed area, though it’s only a few blocks from Five Points. It’s also a bit problematical for portraits because it’s in a narrow alley/driveway, and because even though there are no designated parking spots, it’s not all that unusual to find someone parked in front of. Best bet for getting a nice pic in the gondola is probably early morning. Notably, there is another mural visible from Gallatin if you are south of The Cleo, up on the roof level of the garage. What can be seen looks nice, but it’s not really public art since only the ground floor of the garage is open to the public.

KMBaloonDetail

Located at 1034 West Eastland Ave, near the corner with Gallatin Road, across from the Rite Aid. It’s very visible if you are on Gallatin coming from the north. There is some guest parking at the Cleo, and it’s usually possible to park across the street.

Donut art in East Nashville

Oakley

I would like to lose weight – this ain’t going to help. Donut Distillery is setting up shop in East Nashville, just a few blocks from my house. Originating as a food truck, Donut Distillery is going brick-and-mortar and bringing new life to the old Mrs. Winners on Gallatin near Five Points. Though not open just yet, it’s already sporting a spiffy new mural by Kristy Oakley, who does business under the name Where the Art Is. Oakley has been on this blog before, for her work in Donelson. This mural most resembles the main mural she did that is featured in Welcome to Donelson, with the large block letters filled with images of local symbols. There are references here to the streets that form Five Points (“E”), East Nashville Magnet (“A” – alma mater long ago of Oprah Winfrey and also just across the street), Mas Tacos Por Favor and Pharmacy Burger Parlor (“T” – Mas Tacos is another food truck now settled down in four walls), The Treehouse (“A”),  the Tomato Art Festival (“S”), Five Points Pizza (“V” – clever – the Roman numeral 5 – “V”  and a pizza slice), I Dream of Weenie (“L”)  and The Idea Hatchery (“E”). The guitar and records (“S”) might be a reference to Woodland Studios or all the music business in the area. The blue awnings in “H” have me stumped. The “L” with our zip code probably references Shelby Bottoms Park and the greenway, and the bottle of beer (“I”) all our many bars. The “N” of course is a nod to the patrons and their business. We also see the downtown skyline as seen from the east side, and the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge, which connects East Nashville to downtown.

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OakleySig

Located at 311 Gallatin Avenue. There is plenty of parking, and street parking is available on Ordway Place.

 

I see purple

BDonahueForrestPurple

Back when I blogged about the Mermaid House, the former owner contacted me. She let me know that there were more murals around back. Like the mermaid in front, this mural is the work of Brandon Donahue, who, like myself, is a professor at Tennesee State University. There is also something of a surprise here. For the most part, graffiti taggers are respectful of murals, but not this time. The style of the tag is one I’ve seen around East Nashville. “Editing” is always a possibility with outdoor art. The back fence of the yard of the house next door also has a colorful mural. (See the slideshow below.) It’s not signed and does not appear on Donahue’s website, so I’m not sure who made it. One notable detail on this second mural is the small “Hunter’s” sign. Hunter’s was an auto body shop that had extravagant signage a couple blocks from these houses, signage lost in the site’s recent renovation (though not completely – it does appear some of it is being saved).

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Located in the alley behind at 1205 and 1203 Forrest Ave. Street parking is available. These are private homes, so be respectful.

An old key

KeyNorth2

The scope of this blog includes not only murals and sculpture, but also “interesting signs.” And the sign for the old Key Motel definitely counts as interesting. There are at least a couple other of these old survivors on Dickerson, left over from the days before the interstates were built when Dickerson Pike, know also at US Highway 41, was the main route from the north into the city. Currently, the Key Motel is undergoing renovation, hence the fence. While it will reopen as a hotel, the developer is noncommittal as to whether he will keep the name, much less renovate the sign, so the future of this survivor is uncertain. Get your selfies while you still can. The southern side of the sign is actually in better condition, but it’s also partially obscured by vegetation. See below.

UPDATE: I Saw the Sign has been commisioned to restore and update the sign with a new name, The Dive Hotel. I’ll post some photos when I get a chance.

KeySouth

Located at 1414 Dickeson Pike. On the weekends you can park at the school next door. Otherwise, your best bet is the laundry a little farther north.

A Fly Over Tennessee

FlyOverMain

I have driven by this mural hundreds of times, as I live nearby, and finally, I’m putting it on the blog. It’s easy to take the art you see every day for granted. “A Fly Over Tennesee” is an Andee Rudloff production. As she has done with other projects, she designed and drew the mural, and then community volunteers helped complete it. The mural was sponsored by Aerial Innovations Southeast, an aerial photography company that’s right next door. The theme seems to be all the great things you can see from the air in Tennessee. There’s a video of the production of this mural produced by Allie Sultan of Green Scoot Films, with still photography by Stacey Irvin and music by Fred Wilhelm.

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Located at 1626 Russell St. The mural faces the alley between and Fatherland Street, right across from Aerial Innovations, which is at 202 South 17th Street. The fence backs up on the yard of a private house, so be respectful.

East

East

Sometimes I feature old signs. Sometimes I feature graffiti hidden behind a building. Sometimes I feature a mural in some less traveled part of town. But it’s only one time I get to feature the single most prominent piece of outdoor art in Nashville. Sure, some of the downtown and Gulch murals are of a similar size, and the old man on the silo is definitely taller, but none of those are plainly visible from a stretch of interstate that sees about 130,000 vehicles a day. (See this page for traffic history data.) Located on the (surprise!) east side of the river a couple blocks east of I-24, the giant “East” sign on the garage of the Eastside Heights apartments was designed by Riley Carroll and produced by I Saw the Sign, Meghan Wood’s hand-lettered sign company. Because of the Allinder Plumbing Company building, the mural can only be fully viewed from the air, but its placement on a hill looking down on Nissan Stadium ensures that even without interstate traffic, it gets seen by a lot of people. Not really selfie material, unless you get the Allinder people to let you climb on their roof!

Located at 120 South 5th Street. It is a parking garage, but I’m not sure about guest parking rules. Otherwise, the nearest street parking is on Russell Street, on the south side of the building.

Lockeland Boutique

LockelandTable.jpg

The small brick building at the corner of Woodland and 16th Street has a long history. Starting out as an H.G. Hills in the 1930s, it became the beauty shop and salon Boutique Coiffures sometime around 1970. That’s what it was when I moved to the Lockeland Springs neighborhood about fifteen years ago. Of course today the building houses one of the best restaurants in Nashville, Lockeland Table, which opened in 2012. Thankfully, the owners of Lockeland Table kept the wonderful mural of the previous tenants, no doubt confusing the occasional tourist. It is also a reminder of just how much this neighborhood has changed, not just once, but many times. It is reminiscent of some of the older murals found in the Buchanan Street neighborhood. You can read a little more about the building in Lockeland Table’s press kit.

Located at 1520 Woodland Street. The mural is on the east side of the building, facing 16th Street. Street parking is available, particularly on 16th Street. Get you some grub and enjoy the art!

Stay independent

JohnPrine

Back in June of this year, I was contacted by Eileen Tilson, Director of Marketing and Promotions at Oh Boy Records, who was looking for help finding muralists. It seemed that John Prine wanted to do a mural as part of the promotion for his latest album, The Tree of Forgiveness. In particular, she was looking for something that would emphasize Prine’s independence. So I sent her a list of many of the professional muralists I knew. The last I heard about it, Tilson was planning on contacting Bryan Deese. A seemingly completely different story was  Grimey’s New and Preloved Music announced move to Trinity Lane from their Eighth Avenue South location. A few days ago I was driving down Trinity and I saw this new Bryan Deese mural on the side of what used to be the home of Point of Mercy Church. I realized it had to be the result of those June e-mails. It was an article in this week’s Scene that tipped me off that the building, still under renovation when I saw it, was to be the new home for Grimey’s. An appropriate image for an appropriate home. Glad I can say I had a tiny part in making it happen.

Located at 1060 East Trinity Lane. There is plenty of parking. Once Grimey’s is open, you can get some music with your art!

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