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nashville public art

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#face

Glyph man

This unusual face has a striking resemblance to the Mayan glyph for balam, the word for “jaguar” and “strength.” The glyph has fangs and is more cat-like, but the pattern of dots and lack of adornment, along with the general shape, suggests a humanized balam. Or maybe it’s just random graffiti.

Located at 1309 McGavock Pike, on the back side of Relax and Wrap Barber and Style (well, that’s what the sign says – on the internet, it’s known and Relaxing Wraps Barber and Style.) There’s plenty of parking here and across the street, though often full with partons of the Village Pub and Garden. Baily and Cato, sadly, has closed. Get a cut, grab some grub, and enjoy the art!

Packing Plant (Part 1, Mural)

PakingPlantRone

And here’s another multi-parter, after I just posted about how I don’t want to do much of that. But the outdoor art at The Packing Plant gallery comes in two very different flavors – a striking mural, and an equally striking prism sculpture. Here, in Part 1, the mural. This is a work by the Australian artist Tyrone Wright, who goes by Rone, who I first featured in Forget the past. (His art is easier to view on his Instagram page.)  This mural, featuring an Australian model, (large faces of women is characteristic of Rone’s work) was sponsored by Vince Herrera of Trespass Gallery in Clarksville. Trespass is no more. You can see in photos of the mural taken shortly after it went in in 2014, that it has been altered, apparently as a result of the arrival of Watkins Gallery at the site, and that the reference to Trespass Gallery has been removed. Art is ephemeral – outdoor art is doubly, triply so.

Located at 507 Hagen Street. The mural faces Gray Street. There is parking on site, and at some nearby businesses. Check out the galleries, and enjoy the art!

What’s in a face?

Baxterface

Corporate America is not big on public art. Oh sure, major corporations routinely fund art projects, often to beautify their own facilities or to gain some good publicity, but when it comes to the brand, the brand must be pure. And if the company is building chain stores across the country, be they restaurants or retail, little deviation is allowed. Chain stores and restaurants seem to exude some kind of cloud that kills public art. The worst place to look for public art of any kind are those four-lane thoroughfares that have miles of national chains up and down them. Which is why I’m 99.99% certain this face on the property of the Family Dollar at the corner of Home and Gallatin was not authorized, and will probably be painted over soon enough. This is found on a concrete enclosure protecting the store’s garbage dumpster. Less interesting graffiti is found on the other two sides of the enclosure. A note to business owners tired of cleaning up graffiti – you should put in murals. Taggers are mostly respectful of mural art. You could save yourself the trouble of cleaning up graffiti and make the neighborhood more interesting in one go!

Located at 3407 Gallatin Pike. The face is found on a concrete “box” behind the store, at the corner of Home and Baxter, facing Baxter. Load up on unnecessary plastic objects and enjoy the art!

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