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I see purple

BDonahueForrestPurple

Back when I blogged about the Mermaid House, the former owner contacted me. She let me know that there were more murals around back. Like the mermaid in front, this mural is the work of Brandon Donahue, who, like myself, is a professor at Tennesee State University. There is also something of a surprise here. For the most part, graffiti taggers are respectful of murals, but not this time. The style of the tag is one I’ve seen around East Nashville. “Editing” is always a possibility with outdoor art. The back fence of the yard of the house next door also has a colorful mural. (See the slideshow below.) It’s not signed and does not appear on Donahue’s website, so I’m not sure who made it. One notable detail on this second mural is the small “Hunter’s” sign. Hunter’s was an auto body shop that had extravagant signage a couple blocks from these houses, signage lost in the site’s recent renovation (though not completely – it does appear some of it is being saved).

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Located in the alley behind at 1205 and 1203 Forrest Ave. Street parking is available. These are private homes, so be respectful.

Hidden lands

A&ITower

Above is a detail of the mural that is found on the east wall of Art and Invention Gallery.  It is impossible to take a full picture of this mural, for parts of it are hidden behind BBMS and Riveter, two of the shops found at The Idea Hatchery. The Idea Hatchery is a small business incubator on Woodland, with eight small sheds that contain local start-up businesses. Riveter is a jewelry shop, while BBMS sells the clothing of fashion designer Maria “Poni” Silver.  The sheds obscure the mural, but if you peer around the back of them, you can still see the whole mural. It was done by Phil Carrol and Todd Hatfield and is dated 2001, making it one of the older murals in Nashville. According to the owner of The Idea Hatchery, Carrol and Hatfield work in the film industry and did the mural once when they were briefly in Nashville.  (There are IMDB pages for both those names for people who do art for movies, but I’m not completely confident they are the right people.) In the slideshow below, I show the various sections of the mural going left to right.

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Located at 1106 Woodland Street. There is street parking and paid parking in the area. I recommend the 100 block of 12th Street North (just north of Woodland) as the closest place to easily find free parking. Fill up on goods from small local businesses and enjoy the art!

Eastland graffiti

EastlandDuff

It is becoming more and more evident that Nashville business owners understand the importance of art as part of their self-presentation. The Eastland is yet another of the many upscale apartment and condo buildings that have been sprouting like weeds in the current Nashville real estate market. It’s all crisp modern lines, muted whites and greys, but then you turn into the little tunnel that links the parking lot to the road and you encounter this vivid splash of color, courtesy of Troy Duff. There are the obvious neighborhood nods, like “615” and “37206.” It’s also a sign. Look closely under the arrow, and you’ll see “The Eastland.” It isn’t signed, but following a hunch that it was his work, I found it on Duff’s Instagram page. That post is dated August 27, 2017, making the piece about a year old.

Located at 1035 West Eastland. There is parking at the apartment building and some limited street parking, as well as an adjacent parking garage.

Fanny’s House of Music

FannysFullNorthFounded in the teeth of the 2008 financial crisis, Fanny’s House of Music has become a neighborhood icon that has gained national recognition for its place in the music business and its role in providing a comfortable space in music for all, particularly women and girls. The owners, Pamela Cole and Leigh Maples, both music business veterans, named their store after Fanny, one of the first significant all-female rock bands. They’ll sell you a guitar, and they’ll teach you how to play it, too. And they have art. The large painting is by Scott Guion, a New Orleans based artist. It features a whole host of female artists, like Suzie Quatro and Maybelle Carter, Dolly Parton and Joan Jett, and many more. You can get smaller versions inside. The Carter image on the mural is based on the same photo used as the inspiration for the mural featured in Carter Vintage Guitars (Part 2). Along the bottom of the house is a series of unsigned panels that are the work of Andee Rudloff. The text reads “Beauty is having the courage (explore) to be you.” [Parentheses mine]

Fanny's Guion Mural

Located at 1101 Holly Street. The murals actually face 11th Street. There is theoretically free street parking on 11th and on Holly and nearby streets. Good luck on the weekends and at night. A paid lot is across the street. I Dream of Weenie is next door in view of the art, so grab a dog, or buy a guitar, or both! – and enjoy the art. Warning – I got chigger bites taking photos in the grass in front of this art.

Treehouse Art

TreehouseMain

This would qualify as hidden (or semi-hidden) art were it not for the scads and scads of people grabbing some of the only free parking in Five Points. The mural sits on the backside of The Treehouse Restaraunt. Treehouse opened in 2013 and quickly gained a solid reputation, though the mural didn’t appear until June 2015. Treehouse’s Instagram account credits the Brothers Collective made up of Joseph Copeland and Alic Brock. Brock is better known (at least in his artist persona) as Alic Daniel, and has been seen on this blog in Off the wall (Part 2). Hans seems to have deleted his Instagram and other accounts, and I haven’t been able to locate him. The scribbled lines are characteristic of Daniel. The rest, including Daniel Day-Lewis as Bill the Butcher and various presidents, I’m uncertain as to the contributor. It’s impossible, certainly without a fisheye lens, to get the whole mural into one shot. See below for the rest and for close-ups.

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Located at 1011 Clearview Ave. Clearview is the narrow road not much bigger than an alley that is the fifth road in Five Points. The mural is on the back (north) side of the building, facing the alley. You are unlikely to get a clear view of the mural when Treehouse is open – your best bet is early in the morning. Free parking is available on Clearview and some neighboring streets, and there are numerous pay lots nearby.

 

Rainbow pizza

FivePointsMain

I would probably be two or three pounds lighter if Five Points Pizza did not exist. Opened about six and a half years ago in where else, Five Points, it quickly became a popular spot for a pie or a slice. A couple of the night shift take-out workers know my name. Oh, right, we were talking about art! A few months ago this Nathan Brown piece went up in the alley that separates Five Points Pizza from Battered and Fried. Again, it’s another one of Brown’s colorful geometry problems, and it’s also another example of Google Fiber promoting its brand through art sponsorship. I had to shoot it at an odd angle because of the geometry of the alley. A shot from the other side is below.

FivePointsAlt

Located at 1012 Woodland Street. The mural faces west and is impossible to miss from Woodland if you are headed east. There are paid lots in the core of Five Points, but free street parking is available if you walk a couple blocks.

Woof woof!

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Sometime more than a year ago (this blog is nothing if not on the spot!), this whimsical piece appeared on the fence of the parking lot that adjoins the apartment building at Fatherland and South 10th. As it boldly proclaims, this is an Eastside Murals project, the business name of Ian Lawrence and Sterling Goller-Brown. The apartment building is by all appearances a low-income rental, something that used to be common in East Nashville but is much less so today. Hopefully, both it and the mural have a long future, as we need lots of both art and affordable housing.

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Located at 300 10th Street South. The mural lies right off the entrance to the alley that runs parallel to and between Fatherland and Boscobel. There is street parking on Fatherland, though you might have to walk a ways. Make it part of your Five Points crawl and enjoy the art!

Bend and twist

MarthonPilatesMain

Marathon Pilates of East Nashville brings us two kinds of art, energetic and serene. “Energetic” is the graffiti style sign on the side of the building brought to us by Troy Duff, a Nashville artist known for his energetic and often graffiti-inspired pieces. His work has been on this blog before, such as Eastern Pizza, just a few blocks away. “Serene” is the Marathon Pilates logo, found on the front and the back of the building (see below). The logo is a two-dimensional representation of a structure Buckminster Fuller described as an example of vector equilibrium. Here, let Bucky describe it for you! Here’s Wikipedia on the topic, where it’s called a cuboctahedron. Many people seem to think it has spiritual or cosmological implications.

Located at 966 Main Street. The Duff piece is in the alley on the east side of the building, while the logos are prominent on the front and back. Marathon Pilates has parking in front and back, as do neighboring businesses, though this is tricky during weekday work hours, and much easier on the weekend. There is a pay lot a couple doors to the east on 10th Street.

Drive away

HuntersTop

Five Points in East Nashville was not always the place you went for bar hopping, fine dining, and trendy shops. It used to be the place you got your car fixed. Margot’s, Burger Up, East Side Smiles* and the Family Dollar all used to be service stations, the kind of places that filled your tank and replaced your spark plugs. Gym 5 was an auto repair place, and Battered and Fried was once where you found Jackson’s, which sold tires, tubes, and batteries and had a fleet of trucks to deliver them around town. Beyond the Edge at one point was a welding shop that no doubt helped repair cars. There were probably more. Now only Firestone and Main Street Tires are left in the immediate area. Hunter’s Custom Automotive is the latest to leave (they’ve moved to Trinity Lane), its property snatched up to be developed as restaurant space by Fresh Hospitality. Already the small building they owned across the street has undergone major renovations (no longer will Hunter’s employees play the dangerous game of crossing the street right where Main makes a right angle curve and become Gallatin – the light went in not long before they moved). What will happen to the Hunter’s murals is unknown at the moment, but in all likelihood, they are doomed, as are the glittery signs. I only learned this past weekend that those signs make a fair amount of noise when it’s windy. Whooooooosh.

UPDATE: I drove past Hunter’s this morning (3/28/17) and saw that the brick facade the mural up top is on is being dismantled, and the mural with it. This one is a goner.

Located at 975 Main Street. Until it becomes a construction site, you can park in the Hunter’s lot. Climb the stairs to get a better look at the main mural, though I recommend against clambering on to the roof. The sign and the mural above both face south, while the  King of Chrome mural is on the west side of the building. (*East Side Smiles may be a different building, but there did used to be a service station at that spot. Family Dollar may also be a “new” building.)

HuntersLowHuntersSign

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