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Three years and counting

Because I’ve been doing a lot of travelling lately, I was out of town for the third-year anniversary of this blog, which happened on June 30. Much has happened since the second anniversary of this blog. For one, the outdoor art scene continues to blossom here in Nashville. New murals appear seemingly every day, and at my usual three-posts-a-week pace I’ll never catch up! And the world has noticed. Do a quick Google search for “Nashville street art” or “Nashville murals” or related searches, and you will find dozens and dozens of articles, blog posts, and various guides to whatever the author considers to be the best, the prettiest. or most “Instagramable” murals. And while this blog doesn’t show up very high in those searches, traffic has been steadily improving. The first year, the blog got a few hundred views a month. In the second, 1000-1500 views a month. In the third year, that number hovers in the low 2000s. Still small fry, but the moving in the right direction. And unlike any of those articles or “guides,” I really am trying to chronicle it all!

Kind mural street art Nashville
As it was last year, the subject of the most popular post on this blog.  Read about it in The Kind Way.

Many of the observations I made in the post I wrote about the second year anniversary remain true. The relationship between art, tourism, and gentrification remains strong. It’s still true that most art, particularly murals, is found on local businesses, not chains. Nashville business owners are getting the message – murals generate foot traffic, and they encourage people to take a picture and “check in” at the business, which amounts to free advertising. And art very much still breeds art. Businesses and building owners are encouraged to seek out artists for their site when they see their neighbors doing the same thing.

Cash mural street art Nashville
Despite, or perhaps because it no longer exists, the subject of the second most popular post on this blog. See The Johnny Cash Mural

Having recently traveled to New Orleans and the Dallas-Fort Worth area, I can say that our mural/outdoor art scene compares well to those areas. One mistake we did not make, which until recently New Orleans had, was to put onerous permitting limitations on art. I would also say that while there are definitive art districts, in particular 12 South and Downtown, we do a good job of spreading art out – just look at my map.

I continue to be concerned about the impact of gentrification, notably on the less celebrated artists who have decorated Hispanic and Black-owned business. In particular, the work of the artist I have dubbed the “Unknown Buchanan Street Artist(s)” is endangered. That’s one reason I do this blog, to archive what is an inherently ephemeral form of art.

Restaurant mural street art Nashville
One of the “Unkown Buchan Street Artist(s)” murals that may be threatened by gentrification. See Catered Art.

For now, this will continue to be a Davidson County-only blog. When I think of some of the massive collections of work I have yet to chronicle, notably the Elliston Place garage and the dozens of musician portraits in Berry Hill, it’s hard to think about expanding. For that matter, I have dozens of files under the heading “Future Blog Posts,” most of which I need to do more research for or reshoot photos (I have gotten very picky about the pictures I use.) But visiting the Metroplex (as Dallas-Ft. Worth is known), I realized if I lived there I would have to do an area-wide blog, and I think I will have to do so here as well in time. The surrounding counties have developing outdoor art scenes of their own, often by the same artists who work in Davidson County. It’s really the same scene, and singling out Davidson County is somewhat artificial.

Bird Mural street art Nashville
Still my answer when people ask me about my favorite mural in Nashville. In part, because you are very unlikely to find it on Instagram. See A bird in the bush

The header photo is the mural at Chromatics. The artist who made it, TACKZ, recently contacted me, which reminded me that, to my knowledge, only the refurbished Painter Man at the Hard Rock Cafe on Lower Broad is older. The Chromatics mural is a true survivor, dating back to 1993. We definitely have a very different outdoor art scene than we did in 1993. We actually have one now! I intend to continue to chronicle it as best I can.

Little’s of Germantown

Little's mural Nashville Street art

Nashville lies far from any ocean, but there are these things called airplanes, and since 1955 Little’s Fish Company in the heart of Germantown has been providing fresh fish to the people of Nashville. As a long-standing family business in this historic neighborhood, it’s only appropriate that Historic Germantown Nashville (the local neighborhood association) would choose it as the canvas when they received a $5,100 Creative Placemaking grant from the Tennesee Art Commission. Five small murals cover filled-in windows. Starting at the left, Michelle Farro’s piece depicts the historic Church of the Assumption, founded by German Catholics in 1859. Next, a Diamond Studio (Yvette Renée & Mark Cowden) piece depicts the annual neighborhood Octoberfest. The third piece, which depicts a Germantown street leading to the State Capitol, is signed by Jake and Hana Elliott, who are also known as WHAT. Creative Group. Sometimes obscured by a bush is the next piece by Shea Moore (you’ll need to scroll down), who is both a painter and a makeup artist. Her piece depicts various people of Germantown. Last is a piece by Audie Adams, who is part of the Thoughts Manifested crew. His piece depicts the founder of Little’s and acknowledges the building’s origins as an office of the Salvation Army.

This blog post would have been a much harder slog to research without this article from the late, lamented Nashville Arts by Peter Chawaga.

Located at 1234 6th Avenue North. The murals face Monroe Street, on the north side of the building. Street parking is available. Load up on fresh fish and enjoy the art!

Colorful Community

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Sometimes you think the research will be easy, and it isn’t. This prominent piece on the corner of Rosa Parks and Taylor is signed in more than one place “Numberwalls.com Murals by Mike + Jenny.” Unfortunately, that website doesn’t exist anymore. But with some internet sleuthing and some help from the Wayback Machine, I was able to identify the artists as Mike Luckett and Jenny Luckett. (Jenny is now doing jewelry, but I am not sure what Mike does now.) A Wayback Machine snapshot of the Numberwalls.com site from November 2009 invites readers to view their “Colorful Community” mural which had been commisioned by Village Real Estate and was completed with the help of over one hundred volunteers from the neighborhood. It includes such icons as the State Capitol Building, the elevator towers of Public Square, and the Monroe Street United Methodist Church. The wall itself hides a parking/storage area that belongs to the Metro Development and Housing Agency.

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Located on the 1400 block of Rosa Parks Boulevard and the 800 block of Taylor Street. The best bet for parking is the Kroger across Taylor Street. There is some street parking on the 700 block of Taylor.

The Kind Way

KindMural

Recently, a new mural appeared on the side of the same building where the Harmony mural is found. The new mural is the product of Rebekah Rinehart and Sarah Gail Nelson, founder and co-founder of The Kind Way. That website only went up very recently, so there’s not much information on what Rinehart and Nelson will be doing to promote kindness, but maybe once they get their blog going they’ll have more to say. Already you can inquire about getting a kindness jacket, and maybe more in the future (the page is labeled “The Kind Collection.”) They are apparently planning to do more murals in more states and cities. There’s a video on that last link about the Nashville mural, which you can also find on Youtube. It would seem you can chalk in your answer to what kindness is, but I haven’t tried it. (You’d have to be rather tall!) The mural is dedicated to the memory of Randall W. Binford (see below).

KindMuralDedication

Located at 1120 Fourth Avenue North. The mural actually faces Madison Street, on the building that houses Juice Bar Germantown and Little DonkeyCochon Butcher has been this building but is being replaced by Vui’s Kitchen. There is a pay lot on 4th, and if you are also grabbing some grub, the restaurants have some parking, though good luck. There is also some limited street parking nearby.

Harmony

Harmony

This is a very new mural, having gone up in Germantown in early August. It’s small, a little less than seven by nine feet. The message is straightforward, even without the all-caps “HARMONY” across the bottom. Put up days before the recent attack in Charlottesville, VA, it is even more relevant now. The artist is Ty Christian, who goes by @creativ_ty on Instagram. His Facebook page gives much more weight to his career as a musician. The mural also credits @relic90 as the producer, which turns out to be the name of a “Nashville based sock company,” though they also sell T-shirts and other items.

Located at 1120 4th Avenue North. The mural actually faces Madison Street, on the north side of the building that houses Cochon Butcher, Juice Bar Germantown, and Little Donkey. There isn’t much free parking or street parking nearby, but there’s a paid lot across the street on 4th. Choose from one of your many grub options and enjoy the art!

Face the line

Rolf&DFront

Rolf and Daughters is one of the top restaurants in town, with a national reputation. And it’s got a special mural to go with that reputation. This mural, put up in 2014, is the work of Shantell Martin, an artist based in Buffalo, NY who is known for her black and white line compositions that mix words, faces, and other imagery. On her website, there’s a page where you can see how the mural progressed. Be sure to scroll to the bottom to catch the photo of the Rolf and Daughters staff posing in front of the mural.

Located at 700 Taylor Street in Germantown. The mural faces south, dead across the street from where 7th Avenue North dead ends into Taylor. There is street parking available, though depending on time of day you might have to walk a bit. R&D only reserves a portion of their tables. The rest are for walk-ins. Reserve a table, or try your luck. Either way, enjoy the art!

RolfandDSide

Call me Ishmael

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Ok, it’s a blue whale, not a white one. Sue me. Our blue cetacean friend is found on the side of the soon to be opening Alexis+Bolt, which bills itself as a “carefully curated shop for men and women,” whatever that might mean. The sign on the front suggests that friendly dogs and their humans are welcome. The mural itself is a product of Eastside Murals, the moniker under which Ian Lawrence and Sterling Goller-Brown do their work. I’ve featured their work before, such as in The cats are loose. I know of at least one other animal mural from them – perhaps something of a theme.

Located at 506 Monroe Street in Germantown. The mural is on the east side of the building, facing 5th Ave. Street parking is reasonably available. If you go Feb 18th or later (the advertised opening day) you can find out what the carefully curated goods are!

Swoosh!

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While a lot of art one finds in the open has been done for love, it can certainly help to have patrons. Here, the developers of The Flats at Taylor Place, SWH Partners, decided to add some drama to their modern apartment complex in Germantown. For this, they turned to John Medwedeff, who produced “Confluence” (2014) for them. It certainly makes a statement. Check out Medwedeff’s page – you’ll see he has a certain style. He knows what he’s good at and sticks with it.

The address of the apartment complex is 1515 5th Avenue North. Not that you are likely to miss it, but the statue lies between The Flats and 5th and Taylor, across from where Van Buren Street dead ends into Fifth Ave. Many apartments and condos and restaurants in the area, but street parking is plausible. Get a reservation at 5th and Taylor, or maybe view your next apartment – and check out the art!

Line and color

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Germantown and Salemtown, which lie between Jefferson and I-65 to the north and south, Rosa Parks and the river east and west, have undergone an extraordinary transformation in the last few years. One of the oldest neighborhoods in Nashville is filled with new, new, new. Even in a boom town like Nashville, what’s happened here is hard to fathom. A low-income neighborhood has been turned into a raft of condo complexes, brand new homes everywhere, and a handful of beautiful renovations. In an area with so much that is brand new, not a lot of public art is found. But there’s some, like on this renovated house across from Monell’s. I include it here because of the playful paintings in the windows. They are Alic Daniel pieces like the one featured in Off the wall (Part 2), but less frenzied. A Google street view picture from March 2016 does not show the paintings, so these are fairly new.

Located at 1228 Sixth Avenue North, next to St. Mark Baptist Church. Street parking is available but a little tough. This is a private home, so be respectful. Little’s Fish Company is a couple of doors down. Grab some fresh fish and enjoy the art!

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