Search

nashville public art

No art left behind

Tag

#publicart

Rivive on 12 South

On this blog, I’ve neglected somewhat the 12 South neighborhood. (And yes, my Nashville memories go back to when it was just 12th Avenue South.) It’s one of the most important tourist destinations in Nashville, which means it has a lot of murals and it’s also a hard place to get clean pictures of murals, with all the people and cars. And parking? Uff. But I really should have posted about this one sooner, because it’s one of the better murals in Nashville. It’s not flashy, with a muted palette, but it also looks like nothing else in town. It’s by a prolific local artist I’ve featured many times, Eric Bass, aka Mobe Oner (the name he signs most of his work with, including this). The fox is just beautiful (see the close up in the second slideshow below). Look at the tall tree on the far right. In the summer, and especially in late fall, it will blend with the live trees behind it. This mural also has something of a twin as well, because it’s sponsored by Rivive, a non-profit that looks to raise awareness about and improve river resources in the Nashville area. They also sponsored a mural downtown by Beau Stanton. Both murals are meant to make viewers think about river conservation and about the forces that impinge on rivers. Mobe Oner’s mural is more explicit than the one by Stanton. Here we see not only what the Cumberland River has to offer but also what threatens it. The Cumberland slices through downtown and is the reason Nashville exists. The wildlife depicted absolutely can be found on its shores, very close to downtown, notably in Shelby Bottoms Park. People really do kayak right downtown, and there are boat ramps on the east bank in Cumberland Park. But obviously, the city, with all its industry and people, makes life tough for the river as well. There’s a giant riverside metal recycling plant right downtown, PSC Metals, of which there has long been a discussion about moving it somewhere else, but as yet to no avail. And in the mural, you can see two icons of Nashville – the Batman Building, and construction cranes. The pressures on the river are real, and sometimes it fights back, but it’s certainly a critical Nashville resource, and the more it can be protected, the better.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 2814 12th Avenue South. Despite the sign, Iyengar Yoga, now called Chestnut Hill Yoga, is no longer in the building. The mural is on the south side of the building, facing Paris Avenue, on which there is street parking. The reality is parking is hard in this neighborhood, given all the tourists. Be kind to the people who actually live here in making your parking choices.

Seen today, hidden tomorrow

Unknown artistr mural street art Nashville

When the building at 912 Main street was torn down (a building I talked about in A few words and then who knows), this part of the east wall of 914 was exposed. It’s the same wall that contains the mural featured in  Or you could just watch the video, which is on the long-exposed south part of that wall. It’s a Jack Coyle piece, and I decided to go ahead and put it on the blog because I imagine this space will soon be a construction site. Note also that the clearance of the site at 916 (formerly Holleman Transmission) makes the mural in A few words and then who knows much more visible (I put new photos up), but all the murals here might be threatened, either with destruction or simply being hidden by whatever comes next. For that matter, it 914 is ever town down, the mural featured The cats are loose would be lost, as it’s on the backside. So check all of them out soon, as you may not be able to for long. Call them all endangered art.

Located at 914 Main Street. The mural is on the west side of the building, facing downtown. There are a few spaces in front of 914, though your best bet is probably parking across Main on McFerrin, and there’s a light to help you cross.

Olive & Sinclair Chocolate Co.

Nashville locals know that there’s only one place to get locally made, bean-to-bar chocolate – Olive & Sinclair Chocolate Co. They are widely praised and, more and more, widely distributed, at least in the Nashville area. And like a lot of local businesses, they have some great art. The large mural was done up as an old-fashioned sign, which fits with their grinding techniques that go back to the early 1900s. It also fits with the history of the building as a furniture maker for many years and before that an H. G. Hill grocery store, a local chain dating back a century that has since largely become a real estate company, tuning their old properties into gold. The mural was designed by Sideshow Sign Co. , whose principal designers are Luck Stockdale and Madeline Westfall, and it was produced by Telicia Lee. Sideshow has designed a lot of signs Nashvillians would be familiar with, such as the CMT sign and the signage for Barista Parlor. Lee’s work is primarily cloth backdrops for photoshoots, and on her Instagram account, you can see a lot of celebrity photos taken in front of her backdrops (and plenty of regular civilians as well). Sideshow is also responsible for the rest of Olive & Sinclair’s branding, such as their signs and their iconic chocolate bar wrappings. The wall with the main mural is also home to a @forbecks Lego Man (It’s to the left of the mural above – see below). Olive & Sinclair is also in the habit of decorating their windows. I’ve included a few examples below, in a couple of which you can see your intrepid blogger’s reflection. I can not recommend Olive & Sinclair enough. If you live in Nashville, you probably already know. If you don’t, put it on your list for your next visit.

For Becks Lego man street art Nashville

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 1628 Fatherland Street. The mural faces 17th Street N. There is street parking available.

The Owl and Rose

On the Charlotte Avenue branch of the local chain M.L. Rose Craft Beer & Burgers (so named because their original location is in the Melrose neighborhood) you can find this mural of an owl and a rose. As in L Rose. Mel-Rose. M(Ow)L Rose. It’s kind of like “M.L. Rose,” and M.L. Rose does use an owl in its logo.  The piece is by two artists who have been on this blog a lot, Nathan Brown and Eric Bass, aka Mobe Oner. The rose is reminiscent of the rose Brown did for Topgolf, though less sharply geometric. The owl has more of the geometric shapes Brown is known for, though for what it’s worth, that side is signed by Mobe Oner. (Which may mean nothing at all.) I have to say I debated whether the owl was, in fact, an owl or a cat until I remembered that an owl is part of M.L. Rose’s branding. To take the picture above, I had to climb a low wall and get up on the landscaping. Below is the best view from the sidewalk. There is a tree that blocks a direct view.

Rose Owl Mural street art Nashville

Located at 4408 Charlotte Avenue. The mural is on the west side of the building facing 45th Avenue North. There is paid parking as well as M.L. Rose’s parking, and some limited street parking in front of the fire station behind M.L. Rose.

Local art comes to Kroger

I have written many times on this blog about how national chains don’t do local art. They have their centralized branding, and that’s that. Good luck finding any local outdoor art anywhere near Rivergate Mall. It can, in fact, be done, but that example is on a local business. Lately, however, things are changing. Top Golf is a recent example, and of course, the local version of Cracker Barrel’s faux-local chain Holler & Dash has its mural. (Cracker Barrel recently bought Maple Street Biscuit Company and plans to rebrand all of its Holler & Dash sites, so that mural may be in danger.) But Kroger is not pretending to be local and is a much more traditional firm than Top Golf, so a big, giant, neighborhood-celebrating mural for its grand reopening done by local artists, Eastside Murals to be precise, is a significant development. I’ve noted that more and more local companies are seeing outdoor art as part of the cost of doing business in Nashville, and maybe now at least some of the big corporate firms are also beginning to get that message. I’ve also noted that art breeds art, and Main St/Gallatin Pike from 5th Street to Trinity Lane is one of the most art-dense neighborhoods in Nashville. The Eastland Kroger sits right in the middle of that stretch. This particular mural came about as a result of Kroger collaborating with The Studio 208 owner Ashley Segroves, who’s been a strong advocate and promoter of mural art in Nashville for several years. Says Seagroves:

Kroger worked with The Studio 208 and Eastside Murals to collaborate for a uniquely East-side vibe. The coolest part of the story is that one of the artists, Sterling [Goller-Brown], grew up behind me on Eastland Ave. I watched him learn to play drums. Full circle and so fascinating since Kroger wanted to stay as local as possible.

The most obviously local part of the mural, besides the words “East Side” and the train trestle bridge from Shelby Park, is the map. If you are used to maps having north at the top, you’ll be a little confused. North is actually to the left, where the grapefruit and peaches are. On the flipped map below, the red “K” in the center of the red circle is where Eastland Kroger is. The map is a little abstract, so ignore the inconsistencies.

Eastland Kroger Map Mural street art Nashville

Hopefully, this is a sign of things to come. The visual fabric of Nashville would be greatly improved if more national chains followed Kroger’s example.  Also, I must note this Channel 4 story about the Kroger grand reopening. It says only that the mural was done by “a local artist.” Really? It’s actually signed. Please everyone, unless an artist wants to remain anonymous, or is genuinely impossible to identify, credit them for crying out loud.

East Kroger mural street art Nashville

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 711 Gallatin Avenue. The mural is on the south side of the building, facing Eastland Avenue, behind the pharmacy. It’s a grocery store, so lots of parking is available.

The birds of Nadeen’s

Along the main drag in Hermitage is a classic American cuisine restaurant called Nadeen’s Hermitage Haven. And it has one of Hermitage and Donelson’s relatively small group of murals. There is certainly outdoor art on the east side of Davison county, from funny sculptures to community murals to local shoutouts. But its outdoor art scene is growing a little more slowly than in the Nashville core – not as many tourists, lots of chain businesses, and these neighborhoods being much more residential than the core are the main reasons. Nadeen’s is a local business, and they hired Brandon Donahue, a fellow TSU professor as I must always mention, to bring art to their walls. I must confess that I moved some furniture to make this picture possible. While the blue furniture fades into the mural, the yellow furniture (see below) does not. Of course I put it back! So head out to the far east side, as there is indeed art out there to be found if you keep your eyes open.

Nadeen's Haven mural street art Nashville

Nadeen's Haven mural street art Nashville

Located at 3410 Lebanon Pike. There is parking on-site, though if Nadeen’s is open, it’s likely to have cars parked in front of the mural, so check the hours. There are signs on the door warning you not to park at the market next door. Grab some grub and enjoy the art!

An icon under the bridge, a revision

I have featured the wall under the Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Boulevard overpass on Herman Street twice before. Originally, it was when the first image on the wall appeared, a portrait of Jimi Hendrix that I featured in a very early post to this blog, An icon under the bridge. That piece was done by Dough Joe of Norf Studios. Later, Norf Studios added two more portraits of Nikki Giovanni and Miles Davis, which I featured in An icon under the bridge, revisited. Now a fourth portrait has appeared, of Tupac Shakur. This is not a Norf Studios piece, but one by JamersonSGC, who frequently signs his work “Low Key Art.” You can see all the portraits together below, and the tag “Mr. Woo,” which I’ve seen in a couple places not far from this wall. If there is any further activity on this wall, I will be sure to keep everyone posted.

Icons mural street art Nashville

Located below the Dr. D. B. Todd Jr. Boulevard overpass on Herman Street, between 18th and 19th Avenues. There is street parking on these streets. Your best bet is probably 18th. Just south of this bridge you’ll find a lot of mural and graffiti art.

The drops of Saint Stephen

Saint Stephen mural street art Nashville

This work is by the youngest artist I’ve ever featured on this blog, save those murals that were collaborations between adults and children, such as my most recent post. Drew T. Morrison’s website doesn’t give his exact age, but a friend who knows the family tells me that Morrison is eleven or twelve years old. On his website and his Instagram account, you can see he’s already quite accomplished, and also that this piece is much calmer than most of his other work. It’s found in the outdoor seating area of Saint Stephen, the new Germantown restaurant owned by James Beard Award-winning chef RJ Cooper. Before Cooper took over the site, it was home to a restaurant called Mop/Broom. Mop/Broom also had a mural on this wall, by Nathan Brown. I never managed to get it on the blog or even photograph it, but it is preserved on Brown’s Instagram account (that’s a multi-photo post, so be sure to scroll through). A new owner often means new art, that’s not unusual.

Located at 1300 Third Avene North. The mural is in the patio on the back (north) side of the building. Street parking is available, but you might have to walk a block or two.

Warner Elementary, Part 2

A few weeks back I wrote about the mural on the low thin wall on the front side of  Warner Arts Magnet Elementary done by  Andee Rudloff and the Warner students and staff and noted it was one of two. Well, this is the second one! It’s on the backside of the school. As with the first, Rudloff work-shopped with students before developing her design. As is usual with her community murals, Rudloff did a black-and-white outline of all the images, and she and students and staff worked together to fill in the colors. Surreal scenes of students, teachers, games and a fair amount of whimsy make up the mural. Rudloff has been working with other schools around town, so keep an eye out for her signature style at your local schools and community centers.

Warner Elementary Mural street art Nashville

Located at 628 Russell Street, on the south side of the building, which faces Fatherland Street. The mural faces east. While the mural can be seen from the street, a closer look requires being on school grounds. You should time your visit for the weekends or after school hours. If more than one or two cars are in the parking lot on the backside of the school, it’s probably open. Parking is available in that lot when school is closed and on nearby streets.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑