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Jammers Market

JammersMain

Normally, I’m a purist about cars parked in front of murals. But I have never seen this mural without a car parked in that spot, usually pulled more far forward and blocking a good chunk of the left half of the mural. It’s apparently the official employee parking space. And as such, cars are really part of the art, ultimately. Jammers Market has no internet presence, not even so much as Yelp review. But it does have a colorful if to me largely indecipherable graffiti mural. A smaller tag on the right seems to read “”DBNER,” which might be what the brown and yellow letters say. Other tags include “IPCTW” and what might be “Kaos Ink” and “Fdc.” Kaos Ink leads to some tattoo parlors in other countries, but I doubt that has anything to do with this.

JammerLeftJammersRight

Located at 1519 Jones Avenue, at the corner with Chickasaw Avenue. There is parking at the market, and there is street parking across the street on Chickasaw.

East

East

Sometimes I feature old signs. Sometimes I feature graffiti hidden behind a building. Sometimes I feature a mural in some less traveled part of town. But it’s only one time I get to feature the single most prominent piece of outdoor art in Nashville. Sure, some of the downtown and Gulch murals are of a similar size, and the old man on the silo is definitely taller, but none of those are plainly visible from a stretch of interstate that sees about 130,000 vehicles a day. (See this page for traffic history data.) Located on the (surprise!) east side of the river a couple blocks east of I-24, the giant “East” sign on the garage of the Eastside Heights apartments was designed by Riley Carroll and produced by I Saw the Sign, Meghan Wood’s hand-lettered sign company. Because of the Allinder Plumbing Company building, the mural can only be fully viewed from the air, but its placement on a hill looking down on Nissan Stadium ensures that even without interstate traffic, it gets seen by a lot of people. Not really selfie material, unless you get the Allinder people to let you climb on their roof!

Located at 120 South 5th Street. It is a parking garage, but I’m not sure about guest parking rules. Otherwise, the nearest street parking is on Russell Street, on the south side of the building.

Eastland graffiti

EastlandDuff

It is becoming more and more evident that Nashville business owners understand the importance of art as part of their self-presentation. The Eastland is yet another of the many upscale apartment and condo buildings that have been sprouting like weeds in the current Nashville real estate market. It’s all crisp modern lines, muted whites and greys, but then you turn into the little tunnel that links the parking lot to the road and you encounter this vivid splash of color, courtesy of Troy Duff. There are the obvious neighborhood nods, like “615” and “37206.” It’s also a sign. Look closely under the arrow, and you’ll see “The Eastland.” It isn’t signed, but following a hunch that it was his work, I found it on Duff’s Instagram page. That post is dated August 27, 2017, making the piece about a year old.

Located at 1035 West Eastland. There is parking at the apartment building and some limited street parking, as well as an adjacent parking garage.

Dogs, beer, signs

ENBDogMural

There are a lot of dog lovers in East Nashville. You see people out walking their dogs all the time, everywhere. So it only makes sense for East Nashville Beer Works to create a dog-friendly area to get some of that dog-lover money. You can’t have them coming in the front door though since ENBW sells food. Hence a special entrance with a special sign, this one by David W. of Manecoon Design Company. ENBW made that a little bit hard to track down – they don’t credit artists on their website, Facebook page, or Twitter account, but you can find artists’ names on their Instagram account. And I say “artists” because they also have a couple of nice signs that were done by Bryce Damuth, who bills himself as both an artist and a comedian. See his work below.

Located at 320 East Trinity Lane. The white sign is on the east side of the building, everything else is on the west side. ENBW has a fair amount of parking. Bring Rover, grab some beer, and enjoy the art!

Down on the farm

EvergreenFarmFull

When people think Nashville, they think the glitz of Lower Broad, the hipness of 12 South or maybe the interstate traffic jams of all over. But Nashville is merged with Davidson Country, and there are plenty of rural areas, with actual farms, just a few miles from downtown, particularly in the north-central and northwestern parts of the country. Part of this is geography, where a winding river cuts off places far from a bridge, and a steep climb as you go north and west also restricts development. Farm country doesn’t produce a whole lot of outdoor art, but it’s not completely barren. I think this sign on the barn at Evergreen Farm on Brick Church Pike definitely qualifies. I thought about just isolating the sign in the main picture, but the real effect is with the full tableau. I couldn’t find a website for the farm as a farm, but apparently, there is a cabin you can rent.

EvergreenFarmSIgn

Located at 4412 Brick Church Pike. There is no street parking on Brick Church, but less than 100 feet away is the intersection with Jackson Road, and it is possible to park there. This is a private home, so be respectful. And wave at the horses!

Welcome to Donelson

DonelsonMain

There is something a “mural district” in Donelson. Within about a block of each other, there are now four murals (and one lost mural), three of which are by the same artist. While the mural featured In Concert in Donelson! is by Randy L. Purcell, the new murals on the Greater Nashville Insurance Group are by Kristy Oakley of Where the Art Is, as is the mural featured in Paint the town. This building used to house a Nationwide Insurance agency, but with a new identity, it’s no surprise that the “frame” mural below has replaced the Nationwide branded mural that was once there and is featured in On your side. Like the mural in Paint the town, the main mural features local landmarks, such as the Cumberland River Pedestrian Bridge and Two Rivers Park. There are pictures of the mural being made on both Oakley’s Facebook page and the Greater Nashville Insurance’s page. The flower box was built by GNIG director David McIndoo.

DonelsonFrame

Located at 2630 Old Lebanon Rd. The large “Donelson” mural is on the west side of the building and the smaller “frame” mural is on the east. There is plenty of parking at this building and nearby businesses. Plan for possible emergencies and enjoy the art!

Nectar of the gods

TonysFoodland

That’s what one of my professors in graduate school called Dr. Pepper. He is Texan, like me. Sure, we moved to Georgia when I was six, but I never lost the taste for Dr. Pepper. I drink the diet stuff now, and yes, I lost a lot of weight. Because I was drinking a LOT of Dr. Pepper. Wait, this is an art blog! This Dr. Pepper branded tank (presumably not a tank of Dr. Pepper) is at  Tony’s Foodland, a grocery store in Joelton, on Clarksville Pike. Joelton is a very different part of Davidson County from what most people think of as Nashville. It’s much more rural, with actual farms, and houses with huge rural lots. But it’s as much a part of Metro Nashville-Davidson as Lower Broad, which is something that makes Nashville truly great. The Facebook page for Tony’s Foodland has only one picture of the tank with its current livery, which is dated July 13 of last year. I don’t think it’s much older than that, as I drove up there around that time and don’t remember seeing it.

Located at 5529 Clarksville Pike. This is just north of Old Hickory Boulevard. The tank is on the northwest side of the store. There is plenty of parking because it’s a grocery store. Grab a couple liters of Dr. Pepper and enjoy the art!

Red, white and blue barber

ReedWest

When your business sits on a street named after your competitor, who is less than a block away, and when that competitor gets business in part because of his very famous daughter, it helps to have a bright colorful sign to help you stand out. Not that Reed and Sons Barbershop needs to worry too much about the competition from Vernon Winfrey’s Barber Shop. Both have been around for quite awhile and have loyal clienteles that have in some cases been coming for decades. Founded by Carl Reed fifty-eight years ago, it is now run by his grandson Tony D. Reed. Both Carl and Tony A. Reed (Tony D.’s father) can still be found cutting hair from time to time. A 2015 photo found in the Tennesee Ledger story linked above shows the facade as being orange, so this more colorful version is recent. In a rapidly gentrifying Nashville, it’s good to see such an important local institution continuing to thrive.

Located at 410 Vernon Winfrey Avenue. The facade above faces Lischey Avenue. Free street parking is readily available. Get a trim and enjoy the art!

Dutch Maid

DutchMaidWest

Large, three-dimensional signs like this one used to be common in America, but they’ve been out of style for decades. There are persistent survivors in Nashville, like the Weiss Liquor sign featured in A true Nashville survivor or the Ernest Tubb sign and others on Lower Broad. There are even some new ones on Broadway, given its place in local tourism. Other survivors are scattered around town, mostly on the Pikes. This one is located in the rapidly gentrifying The Nations neighborhood, and its fate is uncertain. The laundromat it advertises has long since closed its doors, and the windows are boarded up. It’s hard to imagine any developer tearing this wonderful icon down, but in go-go Nashville, it’s always a possibility. Call it endangered art.

DutchMaidEast

Located at 6227 Roberston Avenue, near the corner with Croley Drive. Plenty of parking on site.

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