Search

nashville public art

No art left behind

Category

Murals

City under the bridge

Usually, I try to use a shot of the entire work as the featured image, but that’s impossible here, as this particular work is spread out over both sides of the underneath of a railroad bridge on Wedgewood Avenue. The wider shots are informative, but I think this detail above best captures the essence of the spread out work. It’s not clear how long these abstract skylines have been under the bridge next to Warren Paint and Color Co. It appears that mold and mildew have grown over some of the work, and some has been tagged with graffiti. That and some general deterioration, including chips out of the concrete that the work is painted on, suggests its been here for several years. I first saw it about a year ago, but I’m sure it’s much older. The abstract buildings may be inspired by the main Warren building (see below). There is also a rainbow-colored “RESIST sign on the bridge itself. That, I’m sure is fairly recent. In the slideshows below the factory, the first focuses on the north part of the underpass, working from east to west, while the second showcases the southside, working from west to east.

brick factory building Nashville

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located on Wedgewood Avenue, between 700 and 654. Parking is tricky here. It is possible to park on a gravel area in front of 654, on the northeast side of the bridge, but I have only done this after hours and on the weekend.

Day Dreamin

While Eddie’s Cee Bee on Lafayette has been closed for some time, the artist JamersonSGC continues to use the building as a canvas. This impressive collection of human and animal portraits emblazoned with the words “Day Dreamin” is found on the back of the building where the old loading dock sits unused. Jamerson (who labels much of his work “Low Key Art”) sometimes likes to edit and reshape his work. See for example the evolution of Low key bee into The full bee (an update). In an original draft (see below), instead of the two people an elephant and possibly a second zebra were taking shape. All that remains of those two animals is the elephant’s tusk, which is engraved with Egyptian hieroglyphics and links the woman and man together. As the fate of the Cee Bee building is uncertain, the long term prospect for this mural is anyone’s guess. But watch this space – Jamerson might decide to revise it again!

Animal Portraits mural street art Nashville

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 109 Lafayette Street. The mural is on the east side of the building, facing Clairborne Street. There is parking in the area in front of the mural, and in the lot on the other side of the building.

Elliston Parking Garage – Part 3, Folek

Folek mural street art Nashville

This mural is a slight departure for this blog, as it in some sense inside. But from the lighting, you might notice it’s exposed to sunlight on one side. This piece by Folek Kelof, who signs his work with just “Folek,” is part of the Elliston Parking garage project organized by the Nashville Walls Project. The first two (see below) and the ones on the top floor are fully “outside,” while the rest are “inside” the parking garage, but ae very much exposed to the elements, and you don’t need a key or even to open a door to see them, so I think they fit. The mural seems to be flowers done in a style that implies graffiti. I don’t know any mural in town that looks quite like it.

Part 1 Part 2 Part 4

Located at 207 Louise Avenue, just off Elliston Place. This piece is on the bottom floor on the south side of the building. Most of the parking in this area is pay parking. The garage is permit parking, at least on workdays.

Colorful prints

In a less-trafficked part of Midtown, there’s a block with a lot of colorful art. On 17th street, the Eclipse Mart (now closed) has a couple of murals and right off that is Prison Alley, which is filled with graffiti murals, as is the east side of Printer’s Press, around the corner on State Street. The south side of Printer’s Press has these two murals, a collaboration between Kevin Bongang, an Atlanta artist who signs his work @bongangart, and Brandon Donahue, a local artist and TSU art professor. Bongang is responsible for the colorful extended sign partially obscured by shrubbery (if you look on his site he has some angled close-ups that help you see what’s behind the bushes), while Donahue did the Legos and the boy climbing over the wall (see below). Both men were also part of the Off the Wall project, as well as they now painted over Impermanent installation once found on 57th Avenue North. (I do plan to put the two graffiti walls on this blog at some point.)

Donahue Boy mural street art Nashville

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 1618 State Street. Street parking is available.

 

George Jones rides a lawnmower

One of the great legends of country music was George Jones, and one of the best legends about George Jones was the story about the lawnmower. See, Jones went through a long period where he had a serious drinking problem. When he wasn’t allowed to drive himself to the liquor store, he used his driver. And when he lost that option, he took the lawnmower all the way to the liquor store, which was a few miles from where he lived at the time. As he later recalled:

I imagine the top speed for that old mower was five miles per hour. It might have taken an hour and a half or more for me to get to the liquor store, but get there I did.

The New Channel 5 story linked above claims his destination was Colonial Liquor Store, where the new mural is found. Or did this actually happen in Texas? There is a conflict in the sources, but Jones himself said it happened, so Texas or Nashville, it’s still a good story. Colonial Liquors has embraced the legend. Inspired by an episode of Mike Judge’s Tales from the Tourbus (you can catch a glimpse of Jones on the lawnmower in this short trailer), Colonial worked with local artist Shawn Catz, who got permission from Judge and Cinemax (who produced the series) to use Judge’s design on the mural. Jones’s widow was apparently not pleased. But then, the George Jones Museum does have the lawnmower in question on display (just scroll down a bit).

Jones Quote mural street art Nashville

This mural, by the way, covers the mural featured in Mystery of the Spheres.

Located at 2401 Franklin Pike. The mural is on the north side of the building, facing Hillview Heights Road. There is parking at Colonial and across Hillview Heights.

Nashville Ready Mix

Having recently gotten praise for running an “exhaustive” blog on outdoor art in Nashville, I feel a little better about my earlier plan to feature today not another pretty mural (which I’ve been doing a lot of lately because, well, there are a lot of them) but instead this simple and beautiful sign for Nashville Ready Mix, a concrete company. According to that very spare website, they are Nashville’s only locally owned mix company supplying the construction industry. They have no doubt been busy lately. I don’t know who made the sign, or its age, but the weathering on it suggests it has been there for some time. The smaller sign on the west side of the building facing the road is even more weathered. Ready Mix has owned this building since 1992, so it may be quite old for a painted sign. Their trucks use the same livery, which hints at a corporate design firm as opposed to an individual artist. I’ll tell you something – if this sign were anywhere near Lower Broad, it would be all over Instagram. I think it would definitely make a good album cover. I should note I found this sign shortly after shooting the very pretty mural at TopGolf down the street – you should check it out. I’ll put it on the blog soon.

Located at 605 Cowan Street. The main sign is on the south side of the building.  There is parking here and next door, but your best bet is on the weekend when the businesses are closed. No street parking to speak of.

Elliston Parking Garage – Part 2, Zidekahedron

Zidekahedorn mural street art Nashville

This is probably one of the better-known murals in town, at least for those who follow murals. For part 2 of my series on the Elliston Parking garage, I’m featuring one of two on the outside of the garage, besides the ones on the roof. I do intend to do the interior, which is a little different thing for this blog, but it’s an indoor/outdoor space, so I think it counts as “outdoor art.” This is unmistakably the work of Chris Zidek, even without his usual signature,  Zidekahedron. Colorful intertwining geometric forms and plenty of negative space is characteristic of much of his work. This piece, in particular, uses similar themes to that found in another work of his featured in One mural down, one mural up. It makes me a little antsy to have cars in this picture, but a) this is a perfect crop for sharing to Facebook and b) good luck not finding cars there. This is in fact how it usually looks, and the mural is not obscured, so I’ll live with the cars. As noted in Part 1, the Elliston Garage project was organized by the Nashville Walls Project.

Part 1 Part 3 Part 4

Located at 207 Louise Avenue, just off Elliston Place. The mural is on the east side of the building. Most of the parking in this area is pay parking. The garage is permit parking, at least on workdays.

Tailgate Brewery, East Side

A couple months ago, I featured a small mural linked to Tailgate Brewery in A hoppy place to tailgate. That small, two-color mural, by Drew Lord, is part of Tailgate’s Demonbreun Street location. Recently, they expanded to lower Gallatin, right next to Nashville Biscuit House. And here Lord, who is Tailgate’s art director, has produced something much bolder and much more colorful. You have the tailgate, you have the brewer breaking open a barrel that sprays out multi-colored beer, and you have an umbrella to protect you from that spray. (The umbrella kind of looks like a made-to-order Instagram target.) When you go to check it out, walk abound to the backside of Nashville Biscuit House. There’s a hidden mural back there.

Tailgate mural street art Nashville

Located at 811 Gallatin Avenue. The mural is on the south side of the building. There is parking behind Tailgate, and at the Biscuit House after it closes in the afternoon. There is also street parking on Petway Avenue on the north side of the building.

Weiss Murals, Part 2 – Tomato Arts Fest

It’s tomato time! Since 2004, East Nashville has hosted the Tomato Arts Fest, one of the best neighborhood festivals in the country – but you already knew that. Why tomatoes? Wy not tomatoes is a better question. People get dressed up like tomatoes, there is, of course, a lot of tomato-themed art, and plenty of Bloody Marys to be had. An art fest should certainly get a mural. In fact, there’s more than one. There’s the one featured in Robots don’t care about veggies, and there’s this newer one by Michael Cooper of  Murals and More. I would have never guessed it was his because of the style, had I not seen on his website a series of photos showing the process by which Cooper and his team made the murals. In the background, you can also see a Jason Galaz piece in the which will be on the blog as soon as I get around to writing part two of Crying Wolf, Part 1. And hey, I just realized the banner behind the tomato is a rainbow flag!

Go to the Tomato Arts Fest! You won’t be sorry!

Part 1

Weiss Tomato mural street art Nashville

The two murals together.

Weiss Murals street art Nashville

Located at 824 Main Street. The mural faces the alley on the back of the building. There is of course parking at Weiss, and at the storage center next door, which is a pay lot. The Weiss parking lot can be tricky on weekend evenings.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑