Search

nashville public art

No art left behind

Category

Nashville Walls Project

The Nations Wall – Part 2

Horse mural street art Nashville

This is the second in the series on The Nations Wall, a massive set of murals on the west-facing wall of Music City Tents and Events, organized by the Nashville Walls Project. This is the second piece going from left to right (roughly north to south), and it’s by Herb Williams. Brightly striped animals are something of a theme of his, as seen in Back with a kick and Guitars and automobiles. He’s also known for sculptures and wall hangings made out of crayons. You can see some of those at The Rymer Gallery on 5th Ave. (Why didn’t I crop the picture to isolate the mural? Blame Facebook’s cropping of shared images.)

Images of the entire wall with all the murals together can be found in Part 1.

Part 1 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8 Part 9 Part 10

Located at 5901 California Ave, Nashville, TN 37209. The murals actually face the 1300 and 1400 block of 60th Avenue North, across from the intersection with Pennsylvania Avenue. Street parking is possible nearby.

The Nations Wall – Part 1

Woodeb Nations mural street art Nashville

A few months ago, a massive set of new murals appeared on the west-facing wall of Music City Tents and Events, with a giant “The Nations” logo as its centerpiece. It was sponsored by the Nashville Walls Project (though as of this publication date it does not appear on their website). It brings together on one wall many of Nashville’s most prolific muralists. My intention is to work through it left to right, which is approximately north to south. I will also include in this first post of the series images of what the whole wall looks like together (see below). This first one is by Brian Wooden, and here we see a common theme of his, the headless well-dressed man. You’ll find it elsewhere, such as in the murals featured in Sharp dressed man with roses and Striding.

Nations mural street art Nashville

Nations mural street art Nashville

Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8 Part 9 Part 10

Located at 5901 California Ave, Nashville, TN 37209. The murals actually face the 1300 and 1400 block of 60th Avenue North, across from the intersection with Pennsylvania Avenue. Street parking is possible nearby.

As long as the grass shall grow

Meulman mural street art Nashville

On this blog, I have been a little slow on documenting the big murals downtown, and this is one of the last I’ve gotten to. Like many of these murals, this one is part of the Nashville Walls Project. It was created in 2016 (aren’t I timely?) by the Dutch artist Niels Shoe Meulman. It’s done in a style he calls “Calligrafiti,” mixing elements of graffiti and calligraphy. In this case, it was also a messy process, as you can see from the photo series on the NWP website. The words come from the chorus of a song written by Peter LaFarge and performed by Johnny Cash, “As Long as the Grass Shall Grow.” It’s found on Cash’s 1964 album, Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian, a concept album about the history and problems of Native Americans. It’s a reference to the broken promises in many of the treaties signed between the United States and Native Americans.

As long as the moon shall rise, as long as the rivers flow
As long as the sun will shine, as long as the grass shall grow

Located at 144 Fifth Avenue North, the address of the L & C Garage. It lies directly behind the Downtown Presbyterian Church. Obviously, there is parking, but as this is downtown, so none of the nearby parking is free.

Windows and rooms

Abstract mural street art Nashville

This one has been up for a while, and I photographed it ages ago, but I had mistakenly filed it as something I had already blogged about. Certainly, anyone who walks down Church Street anywhere near Fifth is going to have seen it. It’s a Nashville Walls Project sponsored piece, done by the Mexican artist Favio Martinez, who goes by Curiot. (Learn a little more about him here – his own page doesn’t have biographical information.) There’s no title for this work, but Curiot makes clever use of the building’s features in a way that suggests windows into strange rooms and landscapes, hence the title for this blog post. I have seen it misattributed to Rone, who did not this one but the one right next to it featured in Forget the past.

Located at 530 Church Street. There’s a parking lot right in front (common for downtown art), but like most of the nearby parking, it is not free. There is free parking for patrons of the downtown branch of Nashville Public Library which is just down the street to the east, but you need validation. So do some research and enjoy the art!

 

Beautiful Decay

BeautifulDecay

This mural manages to be both very large and yet somewhat hidden as well, located as it in an alleyway behind the Downtown Presbyterian Church. Part of the Nashville Walls Project, this mural, called “Beautiful Decay,” is by the Berlin-based American artist Tavar Zawacki. Zawacki started his career as an anonymous graffiti artist using the handle “ABOVE.” In time, he made use of an “above arrow” as his signature. Now that he has come out of the shadows, arrows are still a motif in his work. You can read his description of this mural on his website, and the Nashville Walls Project has a nice photo spread showing the creation of the mural. The trompe l’oeil lends itself to some obvious picture ideas.

Located at 144 5th Avenue North. That’s the address of the parking garage it’s painted on. The church it’s behind is at 154 5th Avenue North, at the corner with Church Street. This is downtown – plenty of parking, almost none of it free.

Rivive

ReviveFullWall

No, I didn’t misspell “revive.” This Nashville Walls Project mural is by Beau Stanton and was done in collaboration with Rivive, a non-profit that looks to raise awareness about and improve river resources in the Nashville area. So talk to them about my spell checker going nuts! The water theme is clear, with a Greco-Roman woman pouring out water, along with fish and other water life. Blanton has some nice photos on his website (including a timelapse video) as does Nashville Walls Project (including photos of the production on the mural). It’s a hard mural to shoot, given its enormous size and the fact there is a building across the street. Certainly, it makes the downtown version of Blush easy to find!  (The writing on the far corner of the building is part of another mural I haven’t blogged about yet.)

Located at 144 5th Avenue North. This is downtown, so there is plenty of parking, none of it free.

Maybe you’ve seen this one?

SiloMain.jpg

I’ve often said I’m a blogger, not a journalist. Still, this is a pretty prominent mural, and it was finished almost a year ago. One issue has been photographing it. You would think something this big and visible would be easy to shoot, but given the industrial area it’s in, getting a good angle isn’t easy. And of course, that’s not whole mural – the rest is below. Sponsored in part by the Nashville Walls Project, the mural is the work of Australian artist Guido van Helten. (That website hasn’t been updated in a while. You can find his more recent work on his Facebook page.) Van Helten makes a specialty of giant portraits of people local to the community he is painting in. The gentleman featured here is Lee “LD” Estes, a 92-year-old lifetime resident of The Nations, the West Nashville neighborhood where this mural is found. The mural represents both the gentrification of The Nations and, in Estes, the longer traditions and history of The Nations. This article discusses that and has some good pictures as well. The silo itself is almost all that’s left of what was once Gillette Grain Co. Now its part of Silo Bend, a 38 acre development project of Southeast Venture that includes both housing and retail. Southeast Venture planned on keeping the silo from the beginning, and commissioned the mural, and now the silo and the mural feature prominently in the development’s branding. You can watch a series of day by day videos documenting its creation, and there’s also a time-lapse video for the whole project.

SiloKids

Located near the intersection of Centennial Boulevard and 51st Avenue North. The portrait of Estes can be best viewed from the parking lot of the shopping complex that includes a branch of White Bison Coffee, located at 5202 Centennial. Getting a clear view of the two children is tricker, and might be considered trespassing, though it’s not marked as such. Go north on 54th Avenue from Centennial, and cross the railroad track, turning right immediately. This is a construction staging area at the moment. The gravel road paralleling the railroad goes right up to the silo. No one stopped me when I did this. Hopefully, once all the construction is finished, proper public access will be available.

From me to you

ZidekBrownMain2

Some unusual presentation for a (somewhat) unusual mural. This Nashville Walls Project mural across the street from the Gulch version of Barista Parlor is really two murals joined together, and is also found in a cramped alleyway where it’s impossible to get a full direct shot. Thus my header photo is a merged shot, one from the left, one from the right, each featuring one of the different artists. On the left, one of the colorful geometric math problems Nathan Brown is known for. On the right, a human figure in the characteristic style of Chris Zidek, who signs his work Zidekahedron. This mural took some time to complete. I went by several times to see if it was finished. If there were paint supplies left next to the wall, I figured it wasn’t. I did, however, catch Brown at work one day – you can see that in the slideshow of close-ups below.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Located at 601 Overton Street. The mural actually faces Mansion Street, on the south side of the Turner Supply Company building. Mansion Street is not much more than an alley and has prominent No Parking signs. You can put some coins in the meters along Overton, but most of the nearby paid lots have one-hour free parking to encourage shopping in the Gulch, so make it part of your Gulch crawl and enjoy the art!

 

There flys a peace crane

WishForPeace

For once, I’m blogging about an almost new mural. The Wish for Peace mural on the side of the Global Education building on Charlotte appeared only a few weeks ago at most. It’s a production of WHAT. Creative Group, also known as Jake and Hana Elliott. They are responsible for some other projects around town, including the mural featured in Don’t miss your ride! It was sponsored both by the local office of Google Fiber (who’ve been promoting a lot of art, lately) and the Nashville Walls Project, though it’s new enough that as of this post it isn’t yet featured anywhere on NWP’s website. I’m really ahead of the curve this time! And why origami cranes? Well, it seems that origami peace cranes are a thing. Specifically, they commemorate the life of Sadako Sasaki, who died at age 12 in 1955 of leukemia induced by radiation exposure she experienced when the bomb fell on her hometown, Hiroshima. Sadako folded cranes in her final days, as her father told her that folding a thousand of them would grant a wish.

Located at 4822 Charlotte Pike. The mural faces east, directly across from Hugh Baby’s, where Porter Road Butcher used to be. There is some limited street parking on 49th Ave, and there is parking across Charlotte at Richland Park. Or you could get a burger at Hugh Baby’s and enjoy the art!

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑