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Heroes (Norf Wall gallery, part 11)

Heroes

Someday I will finish the Norf Wall gallery project. I had thought to just do one big post on everything that’s left, but I think I’ll save that for the ones I don’t know the artist and which have things stacked in front so the pictures aren’t great. This is not one of those. It’s signed “TA” and is obviously the work of Thaxton Waters, who first appeared in this blog in A Soul Break. The main panel includes images of Mahatma Gandhi, the Dali Lama, Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King, Jr. The last one really looks like Etta James to me, who would not be out of place given her role in bridging white and black culture.

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8 Part 9 Part 10 Part 12

Located about half about half a block south of where 18th Ave North dead ends into Herman Street, and under Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Boulevard. Parking is very easy here. The tire company that occupies this space seems to be fine with people exploring to view the art. See the map post for Part 1.

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Hair loss

HairLoss

At some point in time, there was a barber shop/hair salon at the corner of 12th Avenue and Clay Street in North Nashville. The store is long closed, but some internet sleuthing suggests it was called Final Finish Salon. Whatever the name was, it has since been erased, but whoever did that took the trouble to preserve the rest of the mural. The mural is signed $quirt and dated 2003. There’s a bit of damage, possibly from bricking up a window. There’s also a bit of trompe l’oeil, a little three-dimensional effect, perhaps suggesting flipping the pages of a style magazine. The fate of this mural is uncertain, given the loss of the business it once represented. Call it endangered art.

Located at 1233 Clay Street. The mural faces 12th Avenue, where there is substantial free parking. Sadly, you can not get your hair done while you enjoy the art.

Northside Auto Clean Up

NorthSideAutoMain

North Nashville is changing, as is the entire city. This particular mural, with its records of parts of Nashville already long gone, may not be around much longer itself. Northside Auto Clean Up, located at the north end of DB Todd Jr Blvd, is for sale, and the business appears to be shut down, which means this mural goes in the endangered art category. The artist seems to be the same one who did the murals just down the street that I featured in Down at the corner. The style is quite similar, and like one of those murals, this mural references itself! You can see it in the upper right, where the car wash itself is included in the street scene. There are references to bygone North Nashville history. Center left is a sign that reads El Dorado Motel. All that’s left of the El Dorado today is the sign. And the factories are probably supposed to be the old Werthan Mills, which have long since been converted to condos. For more recent history, check out this Nashville Scene video in which Northside proprietor Pinky talks about the time when Snoop Dogg and Young Buck visited the shop.

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Located at 1914 Dr DB Todd Jr Blvd. The mural is on the south side of the building, which is located just south of where DB Todd curves to the northwest and becomes Clarksville Highway. There is for the moment plenty of parking at Northside Auto Clean Up, as it seems the business is closed.

Run and don’t ever stop

RudolpTempleMural

The blog has been quiet for a few days because of holiday madness. (Your intrepid blogger threw a very big party.) This Jefferson street mural has no label, but it’s no trouble to recognize the artist or the subject matter. This is a Yusef Hubb piece, who goes by Dough Joe and is a member of the Norf Collective. And that, of course, is Coach Ed Temple encouraging Wilma Rudolph to run, run, run. Temple was the legendary track coach at Tennesee State University, where among his many accomplishments he coached Rudolph as she prepared for her record-setting gold medal performance at the 1960 Olympics. There is a big statue honoring Rudolph at TSU. There’s one of Temple at First Tennessee Park that is not yet on the blog. Temple died this September. The mural serves as a memorial to him and Rudolph, who died in 1994.

WilmaRudolph

EdTemple

Located at 1022 Jefferson Street, on the west side of the Jefferson Street Sports Bar building. There is parking behind the bar and at nearby businesses. The nearest street parking is across Jefferson on Warren Street.

Love

Love

At 12th and Buchanan, there is a small green building. From the looks of it, it used it be a gas station. It will probably be gentrified before you know it. It’s probably happening now. All the big splashy new outdoor art you’ve heard about? I’ll get it to it at some point. But I also like to archive the smaller stuff that might not be around for long. This is sticker art, paper glued on to the building. Even if nothing happens to the little green building, this piece has a shelf life. Also, there’s a fun spider. See below.

Spider

Located at 1201 Buchanan Street, at the southwest corner of 12th and Buchanan. Plenty of street parking. The image above is found on the garage door facing Buchanan. The spider is on the wall facing 12th.

Wake up! And have some pizza!

Slim and Husky's Wake Up

Slim & Husky’s is the happening new pizza joint on Buchanan Street. Seriously, go there off hours if you can, because long lines are common. The pizzeria is owned by neighborhood locals who are trying to be part of a revitalization of the neighborhood, but the restaurant is also symbolic to some extent of the gentrification that is changing the neighborhood. So the Dough Joe piece has a certain resonance. Dough Joe (also known as Yusef Hubb, aka Joseph Love III) has chosen for his topic the final scene in School Daze where the activist Dap (Laurence Fishburn) clangs the bell on the quad calling out the entire community to, well, “Wake up!” I don’t know who designed the restaurant logo painted on the adjoining wall. Slim & Husky’s website has this to say about the tractor in the logo: “The tractor in our company logo represents our locally sourced ingredients and locally brewed beer. It also signifies the redevelopment of historic North Nashville, something our three founders take great pride in as Nashville natives.”

Slim and Husky's Logo

Located at 911 Buchanan Street. The two murals are in an outdoor seating area that faces Buchanan on the east side of the building. S&H has a fair amount of parking, though it can get full at peak hours. Grab a beer and some pizza and enjoy the art.

All the stars in the sky (Norf Wall gallery, part 10)

NorfWallOneDrop

There are certain projects I haven’t quite finished on this blog. I have learned to avoid when I can setting up a series of posts (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, etc.) as it’s easy to leave them behind. But some venues have so much work, there really is no other way to go about it. Case in point, the old tire factory on 19th Avenue North, near Herman. Read Part 1 to learn about the festival that made all this art happen. Above is a work by Elisheba Israel, owner of One Drop Ink Tattoo Parlor and Gallery. Like what you see? I’m betting Israel would be happy to set you up with a tattoo based on this mural!

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8 Part 9 Part 11 Part 12 Part 13

Located at the north end of the 800 block of 19th Street N., at the corner of Herman Street. It’s impossible to miss. Street parking is very haphazard. There is a lot to see here, and also a lot of overgrown weeds (depending on the time of year) so wear the right shoes! See the marker for Part 1 on the map.

The forgotten factory of 17th Avenue

Boanes

I don’t know much about the abandoned factory on the 800 block of 17th Avenue just south of Herman Street. I know the original deed is dated 1920, and that the property currently belongs to Fisk University. I know also the county assessor’s office values the factory itself at exactly zero dollars and zero cents. The land is a bit more — $326k. It makes sense. The building is probably prohibitively expensive to repair. It’s a shame though – people once made their living here. Now it’s abandoned, crumbling down by the railroad. It’s the kind of place both the homeless and graffiti artists can sometimes be found. I encountered no one when I visited the site, but it is obvious that people sleep here, including in the smokestack, in the very place workers once shoveled coal into the fire. The factory and nearby walls are plastered with tags, mostly from the UH crew, a prolific Nashville group. There’s at least one Betor memorial, so at least a little of this is fairly new (Betor died last December). There are more tags under the adjacent bridge. I’ll feature them in a later post.

Located by the bridge over the railroad tracks on the 800 block of 17th Avenue North. The factory is on the west side of the road. There is a fair amount of vegetation, and if you venture very far, you’ll be out of sight of the road quickly. Street parking is available.

FactoryMachinery

 

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Down at the corner

SamsWestSide

The east side has Five Points, where Woodland, Clearview, and North 11th come together. But what do you call a place where four streets and a cemetery entrance come together? Busy – you call it busy. On the north side of the confluence of Clarksville Pike, 13th Avenue North, Clay Street and Dr. D.B. Todd Blvd, and across the street from the entrance to the Temple Cemetary, lies a humble building nearly as busy as the intersection it presides over. At 2012 Clarksville Pike, The Belly Restaurant, Sam’s Market, and Joyce’s Barber and Beauty Salon ensure a steady clientele. And on the west and east sides of the building, we find art. On the west side, a self-referential mural that includes the 2012 Clarksville building, though showing a mural that looks more like the one on the east side (see below). The businesses named are no longer here. Portraits of students fill out the mural. On the east side, a simpler mural, with an intriguing incomplete portrait. And on a low wall to the west of the building, a fading tribute to the Family Affair Diner, which is lost to history, or at least to Google.

Located at 2012 Clarksville Pike, right where it makes a strong turn to the south and becomes D.B. Todd Blvd. Parking available, though if you park in front of the building, you’ll be backing out onto a busy road when you leave.

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